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Workflow LR tiff pictures converted to jpg including improvements

Beda

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I have scanned many thousand slides into tiff format, 45-50Mb each. The slides are from 1980 to 2007.
What is a good workflow to convert them to jpg at 5Mb each, second I need an automatic improvement in color and sharpness? I can not analyze each photo individually. I realise that a fair solution will work fine in this case.
 

Gnits

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Create a test folder with a sample of your images.

Learn how to import these into Lr...

Then explore the basic exposure tools and sharpening tools.

When you have a combination of settings you are happy with you can create a "Develop " preset, which gets applied to every image imported.

Then you can create an Export Preset, to convert the Tiffs to JPGs. You again will need to experiment to optimise the settings to suit your needs and where you want to store the jpgs.

You will then have a very simple Import / Export process.

Along the way, you may find that some of the tools in Lr allow you to make finer adjustments, remove obvious artifacts, etc.... So, for some images, you may wish to invest the time to manually adjust the image to get the max quality from it.
 
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I have scanned many thousand slides into tiff format, 45-50Mb each. The slides are from 1980 to 2007.
What is a good workflow to convert them to jpg at 5Mb each, second I need an automatic improvement in color and sharpness? I can not analyze each photo individually. I realise that a fair solution will work fine in this case.
I don't think Lightroom is a good tool for this. It's automatic adjustments are very poor, and you can't fully automate the export process to create jpegs. If you want to thighten a screw, you use a screwdriver, not a hammer.
 

Gnits

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I agre with Johan. I personally would build a workflow around Photoshop.

If you have been consistent with your scanning, you might use Lr as your database and apply some standard adjustments. Then use the Lr tools to select out your hero images and fine tune, using a combination of Lr and Ps.

My response above was geared towards a Lr only tool.

A consistent issue with scans is the amount of dust particles which may need to be removed. Extensive use of healing brush etc in Lr leads to a degradation in performance. It is much better to handle these pixel adjustments on a layer in Ps. Also, you can selectively apply layers and masks to specific parts of your image in Ps.
 
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I would caution against converting the TIFF lossless "originals" to 8 bit lossy JPEGs. Since " I can not analyze each photo individually", you may paint yourself into a corner that you can not get out of if the conversion fails for some reason. The 40-50mb TIFFs are not considered large files as the RAW output originals that comes from many newer cameras are this size. And storage should never be a consideration when archiving images. I would concentrate on using LR to catalog the images with keywords and create logical collections. If you need a derivative of some of the images, you can create one after having developed these using LRs tools or Photoshop's. This is what the LR export is intended for. I would only post process those that you intend to use in some further project You can not go back to reprocess and original TIFF if you don't have it.
 

Gnits

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I assume that the original Tiffs will be kept. But Cletus's point is valid. Using Jpgs instead of 16 bit tiffs as your future record (or basis for future edits) means an exponential loss of data.

Also, if you need to edit these at a point in the future the 16 bit tiffs have a better ability handle corrections such as curves, levels, etc.., without the image breaking apart or solarisation occuring.
 

PhilBurton

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I assume that the original Tiffs will be kept. But Cletus's point is valid. Using Jpgs instead of 16 bit tiffs as your future record (or basis for future edits) means an exponential loss of data.

Also, if you need to edit these at a point in the future the 16 bit tiffs have a better ability handle corrections such as curves, levels, etc.., without the image breaking apart or solarisation occuring.
solarisation? OR posterisation?
 

PhilBurton

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I agre with Johan. I personally would build a workflow around Photoshop.


A consistent issue with scans is the amount of dust particles which may need to be removed. Extensive use of healing brush etc in Lr leads to a degradation in performance. It is much better to handle these pixel adjustments on a layer in Ps. Also, you can selectively apply layers and masks to specific parts of your image in Ps.
So it isn't just me. I have been almost "anal" in the way that I can slides just before scanning, but I still get lots of dust and there are occasional scatches due to poor handling. I have a Nikon 5000 scanner and I scan at 4000 dpi, or 130 MB for a single TIFF file.

But storage is so cheap these days. You can buy this 4 TB drive with an improved 128 MB cache for $159 HGST Deskstar NAS 0S04005 4TB 7200 RPM 128MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Hard Drives - Newegg.com. I've had great experience with these drives over the past eight years.

Phil
 

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