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Value of soft proofing in LRC for the purpose of correcting colors for 3rd Party printing (ie Bayphoto in this case)

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stephenkeep

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Recently I was told by Bayphoto that one way to ensure closer alignment of what I see on my computer screen, to the final print product I get back from them is to download an ICC profile they provide and use it with the soft proof feature in LRC? Anyone do this successfully ? tips? Ive never used this function in LRC thanks
 

Woodbutcher

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I soft proof all my prints. I do most of my own printing and have ICC profiles for all the papers I use. It helps me tweak an image to best display on the paper. When you go into soft proofing and select an ICC profile, the first time you make a change to the image (usually to resolve a light or dark clipping) it will as if you want to create a proof copy. This is just a virtual copy with the ICC so it won't affect your original edit. Works nicely.

I actually create a collection of proof copies in case I want to print them again.
 
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Soft proofing process in LrC emulates the appearance of the image on a specific printer using a specific paper. This requires an icc profile that matches the printer and paper. BayPhoto provides this. While, it is not possible to match exactly image appearance on reflective media (paper) with Transmissive media (Computer screen) the Soft proofing comes close. I use it all the time for my own at home printing using a Canon Printer and icc profiles to match the photo paper that I choose.

You will get the best results if you calibrate your computer monitor with a calibration tool such as the i1DisplayPro or SpyderX before undertaking soft proofing .
 

Colin Grant

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Is there any benefit in soft proofing for screen based images (sRGB)? It is something I know some do in C1, although it seems odd to me in that the image is already on the screen!
 
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Is there any benefit in soft proofing for screen based images (sRGB)? It is something I know some do in C1, although it seems odd to me in that the image is already on the screen!
There is certainly no point…if your display is already reproducing sRGB. But there is a potential benefit if the display you use reproduces a significantly larger color gamut than sRGB.

For example, if you use a wide-gamut display (e.g. reproducing Adobe RGB or Display P3), detail in the most highly saturated colors may be lost in sRGB if those colors are outside the sRGB gamut. That could be a problem if you’re editing images for an audience that mostly uses sRGB displays, like consumers and office workers. By soft-proofing in sRGB when using a wide gamut display, you can preview how colors will look when displayed in sRGB, and while in soft-proof mode you can tune colors to look good in sRGB.

In reality, the reason many people don’t bother is that an increasing number of mobile devices on both iOS and Android use wide gamut displays, as do most current Apple computers and mobile devices. And because many colors used in common images fall within sRGB anyway. But if your work does have a lot of detail in highly saturated colors, soft-proofing in sRGB might be worth doing.
 
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