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Understanding the clipping triangles in the histogram

dlhess-outlook

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I need some help with understanding the clipping triangles in the histogram. What is the significance of the triangles turning different colors and how do you get them from those different colors to black? I understand what to do when the triangle is white and how to get it to black. What I don't understand is how to get a triangle from red or cyan or blue (or any other color) to black without grabbing the black/white shadow/highlight sliders to to do it. Seems like the answer lies in the Color Grading panel but I can't find any reference to it.

Sincerely, Dennis Hess
 

dlhess-outlook

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For a good video tutorial, see this one from Julianne Kost (Digital Imaging Evangelist Director at Adobe)
Clipping Warnings In Lightroom « Julieanne Kost's Blog
I appreciate the help. My question is how does one get a colored triangle to go from cyan (for example) to black without moving the black/midtone/white sliders? Kost's tutorial doesn't talk about what to do when the triangles start at some color that is neither black nor white. At about 1:00 in the tutorial she moves the black slider to the left, and the blacks triangle shifts briefly from black to cyan to white. If the histogram's initial condition had been the blacks triangle being colored cyan, which slider(s) other than the black or shadows ones, what would need to be used to get the triangle to go from cyan to black?
 
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It’s true, most tutorials only cover the red and blue colors we see when all channels are clipped. When the clipping indicator shows a color other than red or blue, it means one or more — but not all — of the channels are clipped. For the details on which channel(s) are clipped when you see certain colors, see a chart I posted in an answer to a similar question in this forum.

My question is how does one get a colored triangle to go from cyan (for example) to black without moving the black/midtone/white sliders?
First decide whether it actually causes a visual problem. For example, if the clipped area is not neutral, like a vivid flower color, then of course one of the channels is going to clip before the others. In that case, any clipping that removes detail is unwanted, no matter the color of the triangle.

If the region that’s clipping is supposed to be neutral, then all channels should clip at the same time, so a color other than red/blue indicates a possible problem with color balance. To get the clipping indicator to go straight to red or blue, make the value of the clipping channel(s) more consistent with channels that are not clipping. Depending on the image, you might have to adjust Temperature, Tint, HSL, or Calibration. Maybe Color Grading. In the animation below I used HSL as an exaggerated example, but that’s not always the right solution. In this example, a magenta triangle for the black point indicates green clipping according to the chart in the link above, so I reduced the Green HSL slider as a brute force way of getting the triangle to blue. In reality, I wouldn't do it this way unless it actually made the image look better.

Lightroom-Classic-clipping-channel.gif


In the flower example, you don’t want to neutralize a region where one channel clips sooner, because then you get a gray flower. If the image is properly color balanced, then you still want to stick with the Highlights, Shadows, Whites, and Blacks options to address clipping.

Again, as with clipping and gamut warnings in general, the indicators only suggest a potential problem — don’t rush to fix this just because of the indicator. Use it to take a look at the image to see if the indicated clipping is actually a visible problem. If the clipping does not remove important detail, or is a specular highlight, it might not be necessary to address it.
 
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