Time lapse problem

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lloyddobbie

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Hi, I'm putting together a time lapse sequence made up of around 2k images. I shot in RAW and imported to Lightroom and adjusted the first shot for exposure etc. I then finished off with a crop and a bit of vertical transform.
Then I used 'Sync' to paste all adjustments to the other RAWs.

I then exported to jpg and put them all into iMovie to make my finished article.

My problem is that throughout the whole 3 1/2 minute sequence there is a slight movement/oscillation from frame to frame. It can't be camera movement because the camera was locked down on a tripod and although during the 1 hour of shooting I might expect one nudge, this is constant.
I'm thinking that the problem lies in LR when I pasted the crop/vertical adjustments.

Any thoughts on where I went wrong please?
 
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My problem is that throughout the whole 3 1/2 minute sequence there is a slight movement/oscillation from frame to frame. It can't be camera movement because the camera was locked down on a tripod and although during the 1 hour of shooting I might expect one nudge, this is constant.
I'm thinking that the problem lies in LR when I pasted the crop/vertical adjustments.
It could very well be camera movement unless your camera was mounted to concrete. It could also be the way the crop window latches onto the nearest pixel. Remove the crops and redo the iMovie. If that removed the jitter, then the Crop window is certain to be the culprit.
 

LRList001

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Generally, this time is not used as an actual exposure time, due to the tremendous acceleration of the movement necessary. The inertia of the camera movement ...

A friend of mine just showed me some interior time lapse footage he had shot that has a rather unusual problem that I vaguely recall hearing about before and that the wizards, gurus and sages of CML sghouldbe intriged by.

The footage is an interior daylight time lapse of a library with windows on both sides of the scenne. The shot starts in pre-dawn darkness, time-lapses through full sunlight and ends at sunset. The shot is a rock steady lock off.

The problem is that in the upper right quadrant of the frame a slight moving ghost image appears with the break of day. It looks like a double exposed secondary image exposed over the library scene. The ghost image occupies about 5% of the image area. This ghost image oscillates regularly up and down over an approximately 8 frame cycle. It is definitely not a light leak and, although it looks like a flare, it is not.

At the TK session, they repositioned the ghost image and zoomed in it. It looks very much like a partial image of either the gate or the ground glass -- more exactly it looks like the lower corner of one frame and the upper corner of the next frame, including the frame line.

The camera was an Arri 35 III, standard shutter, standard door -- no video tap, 14mm Zeiss, no filter, eyepiece capped. Norris intervalometer, 3 second interval between frames, exposure 1/16 sec @ f4.0, Kodak 5245.

I seem to recall that time-lapse folks recommend removing the ground glass in certain cases. Can this problem be due to leaving the ground glass in. Does it have somethingto do with the ground glass light baffles?

Brian "memory lapsing on time lapsing and very glad that CML is back" Heller

IA 600 DP
Can't comment much on this except to note that when doing time lapse with a DSLR, the viewfinder should be covered (true any time you do not have your eye looking through the view finder). Otherwise stray light enters the camera and can impact the image under certain circumstances.
 
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