Recommendation for best monitor for photo editing

fsuscotsman

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I've got a BenQ monitor that I just bought. It's a 32 inch version and I am really impressed. I moved up from a 24 inch screen and the difference is HUGE!! Literally! Having more windows, side by side, without them getting to the point that I needed a magnifying glass has been a wonderful improvement to my 60+ year old eyes.
 

mcasan

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iMac 5k 27" or one of the new LG 5K monitors if you have a new MacBook with USC-C TB3 ports.
 

tspear

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I have anew BenQ SW320. So far so good, better than my older Mac screens (2014 Mac Book Pro or 2013 ACD)

Tom

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Katy Melo

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Thanks for the great info! What about bigger screens ?
I’m using my TV in the living room for my desktop display and want to change it with a pro level photo editing screen but also want to watch TV on it . Are there any good options on the market regardless of the price?
 
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Welcome to the forum. Conventional High Definition TV (HDTV). usually does not exceed 1920×1080p. Modern laptop computers use a Hi-DPI or retina configuration providing a much higher resolution (a 15in MBP is 2880x1800 pixels). A 27" iMac has a resolution of 5120 x 2880 pixels. This is often called a 5K display. There are 5K computer displays made by most other name brand monitor manufactures. And Windows is now HiDPI aware so that you can connect a HiDPI display to any computer and get a high definition image. There are also 4K and 5K monitors for broadcast TV.
On the assumption that you get your TV via a cable box. you really do not need a TV capable of receiving over the air broadcasts. Any monitor with an HDMI port will accept your Cable TV signals.
 

bobbabe

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This is a great thread-thank you. Was trying to learn the best settings for a 27"iMac Retina display. There are 14 options from "iMac" to sRGB IEC61966-2.1. What would you suggest for Lightroom use? Ok, anyone answers, after checking "Show profiles for this display only" the options are iMac, iMac Calibrated and iMac Calibrated-2" a bit more limiting. Any suggestions? Thank you-
 
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This is a great thread-thank you. Was trying to learn the best settings for a 27"iMac Retina display. There are 14 options from "iMac" to sRGB IEC61966-2.1. What would you suggest for Lightroom use? Ok, anyone answers, after checking "Show profiles for this display only" the options are iMac, iMac Calibrated and iMac Calibrated-2" a bit more limiting. Any suggestions? Thank you-
I do not own an iMac so can you tell me if the Calibrated option is one that you created or one that came with the monitor? Calibration software usually allows you to name the calibration when the puck is finished.

--Ken
 

bobbabe

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I did not calibrate. That is just one of the three options so i suppose I'd have to calibrate then name. I was just wondering what setting REGB,SRGB ,Adobe works best with LIghtroom .
 
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What would you suggest for Lightroom use? Ok, anyone answers, after checking "Show profiles for this display only" the options are iMac, iMac Calibrated and iMac Calibrated-2"
Lightroom uses ProPhotoRGB for a working color profile. Apple's current displays can display a larger envelop than ProPhotoRGB. Set the display to "Display P3" to get the most colors that your display can produce. In terms of the largest gamut available , " Display P3" is the largest, Some monitors can approach "wide-gamut RGB" , Next in area covered would be ProPhotoRGB, then Adobe RGB, then the smallest envelop sRGB.

Your destination media should determine at the color profile used for the files exported.
 
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Apple's current displays can display a larger envelop than ProPhotoRGB
Huh? I assume you mean can't. There is no display in the world that can show all the colors of ProPhotoRGB and there never will be, because ProPhotoRGB even has some colors outside of the human vision. That doesn't really matter however, because your camera can't produce these colors either.
 
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Huh? I assume you mean can't. There is no display in the world that can show all the colors of ProPhotoRGB and there never will be, because ProPhotoRGB even has some colors outside of the human vision. That doesn't really matter however, because your camera can't produce these colors either.
. Yes you are right, trying to post from memory rather than example
1580912880757.png

 
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I did not calibrate. That is just one of the three options so i suppose I'd have to calibrate then name. I was just wondering what setting REGB,SRGB ,Adobe works best with LIghtroom .
The good news is you have a wonderful wide gamut monitor for editing and viewing you images in Lightroom. So don't artificially limit your self.

For editing and viewing in Lightroom you should always calibrate any monitor to it's native gamut. Setting it to anything else is simply restricting what you can see on the monitor. There are only few specific use cases where you might want to do otherwise.

With a correctly calibrated monitor the color management system (CMS) built in to the OS will seamlessly handle all the color translations necessary including if and when want to export to be viewed on the WEB. This is the point where you want to export the image(s) in the sRGB colorspace for optimal viewing by the millions of mostly uncalibrated displays.

-louie
 
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