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Monitor Calibration

Tinkerbell

New Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2019
Messages
20
Lightroom Version
Lightroom Classic
Operating System
Windows 10
Hi,
When calibrating a NEC monitor with SpectraView II calibration's system, how do you get the three primary colors, RGB, to all be at 100% when calibrating. Thanking you for any help/input you can provide. I am using Windows 10 and Lightroom Classic.
 
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
2,231
Location
Fort Myers, FL
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Classic
I'm not sure what you mean.

When you calibrate you want it to adjust R, G, and B to be correct colors for the scenario you use. Even white at max brightness two colors are likely to be driven less so that they come out evenly when viewed as white.

So I suspect I'm misunderstanding your question. Generally speaking with Spectraview you decide on a White Point, Gamma (probably 2.2), Intensity and Contrast Ratio, and if you have a wide gamut monitor then the color gamut you want to use. These decisions drive the rest of the calibration.
 

Tinkerbell

New Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2019
Messages
20
Thank you for your reply.

I am using a NEC PA wide gamut series monitor and calibrated it to: display luminance of 120, white point 6000K, 2.2 gamma curve and 250:1 contrast ratio for printing with a semi-gloss paper. During calibrating when it came to the RGB primary colors it showed the Green was at the top of the scale and Blue and Red where below this which I believe is telling me they are not balanced for displaying on the monitor. When using the calibrator that came with the SpectraView II sofware, it does not give me the option of adjusting this. My question is how can I adjust the RGB primary colors to all be equal during calibration?

Here is a youtube video from Xrite to show what I am asking:

Thank you for any suggestions or input you may provide.
 

Gnits

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2015
Messages
1,199
Location
Dublin, Ireland.
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Lightroom Version
When I am calibrating a monitor, I usually use the hardware options on the monitor to adjust the rgb settings. Often, these are difficult to find and when found difficult or awkward to adjust. These are monitor and brand specific. Maybe your monitor does not have the option to adjust the RGB settings individually, but worth tracking down its manual to find out.

This maybe totally irrelevant if the software and screen are compatible and advanced enough to have the options to automatically set (or set via software controls) the RGB values of the monitor.
 
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
2,231
Location
Fort Myers, FL
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Classic
Bear in mind that most calibration software does not communicate directly with the monitor in terms of settings. The NEC has hardware LUTs which are being programmed; the Spectraview software can control all aspects of the monitor itself.

Note I'm not sure how that relates to your question other than saying that most monitor calibration discussions may not completely apply to the NEC approach.
 
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