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Monitor brightness & Color profile

rclanger

Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2013
Messages
80
Location
Suffolk. VA.
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
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Cloud Service
Lightroom Version
9.4
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Windows 10
I have read a number of posts regarding monitor color profile. My question is about the monitor brightness. My monitor has a slider to control brightness.

Before I run my Datacolor software to set the color profile where should I set the brightness? I don't think ignoring it would be helpful.

What say you?
 

reidthaler

Reid
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Jul 4, 2008
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383
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San Francisco Bay Area
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I'm not familiar with datacolor software, but with xrite it ready the screen when you run the software and tells you to turn down (usually) the brightness
 
Joined
Mar 29, 2015
Messages
433
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
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Classic
I use a Datacolor Spyder X and it will pause and ask you to make adjustments, including brightness, during the calibration.

It will also complain if your space is to bright with ambient light
 

Photocitizen

alanhaynes.com
Joined
Aug 5, 2018
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72
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San Diego, California, USA
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Classic
The main thing to remember is this: once you've calibrated your monitor, never change the monitor brightness. If you do, you'll have to recalibrate.
 
Joined
Oct 18, 2017
Messages
31
Location
Photographer and Workshop leader
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Advanced
Lightroom Version
I use the Datacolor Spyder. Set your monitor brightness at 120 and adjust it lower as needed. Monitors vary, and many monitors need to be adjusted as low as 100. When you run through the calibration, it will provide feedback on your monitor brightness.
 

Tom75

Active Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2012
Messages
360
Lightroom Experience
Beginner
The main thing to remember is this: once you've calibrated your monitor, never change the monitor brightness. If you do, you'll have to recalibrate.
yes and also never use features like Night shift on mac etc because it will mess up your colors and brightness completely
 
Joined
Nov 30, 2012
Messages
466
Lightroom Experience
Power User
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Classic
Monitors vary, and many monitors need to be adjusted as low as 100.
And if part of the question is how low to set it, the answer to that is that the idea is to get a good match under the lighting conditions of your final output. It is not a single number for everyone, even if everyone was using the same display.

90–120 cdm2 is usually appropriate for print, but where in that range depends on the amount of light at the final viewing location. Commercial printers specify a lighting level to proof prints by, set their controlled print viewing booths to that light level, and then set their display brightness to match the viewing booth.

For home prints, you might have to set a different display brightness for prints that will hang near a big bright window versus a dimly lit hallway. if you make a print and take it to the living room wall and it’s too dark there, that would be a clue to lower the display brightness.

If you mostly produce work for the web or social media, the final photos would be seen on consumer displays and phones that are probably very bright, 150 cdm2 and up...a display calibrated for print could produce an image that looks too light under those conditions, so you might calibrate at a higher brightness level.
 
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