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Print module Max recommended print size base on JPG size

PhilBurton

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My son has used iCloud to share over 200 photos of our grandchild, and its time to order some prints. (No photo printer at home yet.) The originals were shot on late model iPhones so I'm sure that the originals were over 2 MB, but the iCloud downloads are mostly 350 - 700 KB jpgs. Assuming that I print uncropped images, will I get "decent" quality at 5" x 7"? I know that if I crop images, acceptable print size will go down?

If I want to order 8" x 10" / A4 prints, what file size should I be using?

Phil Burton
 
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PhilBurton

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It will be based on the number of pixels. There are a number of articles on-line explaining how to calculate this but I've used this site in the past Pixel Chart | Pixels per Inch - Sorted by Print Size | Nations Photo Lab.

The other consideration is that LR will extrapolate if the image is smaller than needed for a specific print size.
Paul,

Thanks. I did some searching, but your link is the only one that allows you to select a file and determine pixel dimensions.
 
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Print labs suggest print sizes based on pixels and not file size, because file size is not a reliable way to evaluate image quality, especially for a lossy compression format such as JPEG.

In addition, late model iPhones might store original iPhone camera photos as HEIC, and export as JPEG, resulting in two different file sizes for the same pixel dimensions. File size also depends on how much JPEG compression was applied, but even that can vary because some content compresses more than others. And if the same photo had been taken with the Lightroom app camera instead, it would be saved as DNG, which would be a third different and probably much larger file size from the same camera sensor. So the only constant that would be reliable for understanding potential print sizes would be the pixel dimensions, which should be the same in all versions of the same photo.

If I want to order 8" x 10" / A4 prints, what file size should I be using?
By knowing that you want 8" x 10" / A4 prints, we can immediately know the minimum pixel dimensions that would get you there. For the images to meet the recommended 300 ppi resolution for print:

8 inches times 300 ppi = 2400 pixels
10 inches times 300 ppi = 3000 pixels
So as long as an image is at or near 2400 x 3000 pixels (7.2 megapixels), it has enough pixels for an 8 x 10 inch print at or close enough to 300 ppi.

A4 prints are slightly taller and narrower; using the same math, the optimal pixel dimensions would be 2481 x 3507 pixels (8.7 megapixels) for a 300 ppi A4 print.

As long as the iPhone camera used here captured at least 8 megapixels, there should be no problem in terms of pixel dimensions alone. Fortunately, the cameras on iPhones released in the last 5 years can capture at least 12 megapixels, so chances are, 8 x 10 or A4 prints are going to be no problem, and you will have room for cropping if you want, as long as the cropped version still meets or exceeds the pixel dimensions above.
 

DCBolton

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My understanding of iCloud images is that they may be stored at full resolution but downloaded images may be sized for viewing on "screens" which have lower resolution, like 1024 x 768 or 2436 x 1125. You may need to see how to download the full resolution images for printing enlargements.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 
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My understanding of iCloud images is that they may be stored at full resolution but downloaded images may be sized for viewing on "screens" which have lower resolution, like 1024 x 768 or 2436 x 1125. You may need to see how to download the full resolution images for printing enlargements.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
I agree. You need to see if you can get access to the original files that came out of the camera. Many services compress and/or crop images without specifically telling you. Have you son look at an image that has not been uploaded and see what the resolution is. Also, 300 ppi is a commonly accepted standard, but it is not an absolute requirement. I have printed images between 200-300 ppi and had good luck in many cases. I know that I printed a full series of 5x7's from a 3.2MP camera circa 2002 and they looked fine. Get hold of the original files if you can. In either event, send out a sample 5x7 and see how it looks. You might be surprised.

Good luck,

--Ken
 

PhilBurton

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I agree. You need to see if you can get access to the original files that came out of the camera. Many services compress and/or crop images without specifically telling you. Have you son look at an image that has not been uploaded and see what the resolution is. Also, 300 ppi is a commonly accepted standard, but it is not an absolute requirement. I have printed images between 200-300 ppi and had good luck in many cases. I know that I printed a full series of 5x7's from a 3.2MP camera circa 2002 and they looked fine. Get hold of the original files if you can. In either event, send out a sample 5x7 and see how it looks. You might be surprised.

Good luck,

--Ken
Ken,

For now, I have to work within the limitations of the files that have been downloaded, because they are culled, star-rated, keyworded and the best have been edited. We have picked out six photos, and I'll get them printed at 5 x 7 and evaluate the results.

Doing a search I learned that Apple limits file sizes on shared downloads. Sharing full resolution photos - Apple Community. So long term, I need to find another sharing solution for my son.
 
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Ken,

For now, I have to work within the limitations of the files that have been downloaded, because they are culled, star-rated, keyworded and the best have been edited. We have picked out six photos, and I'll get them printed at 5 x 7 and evaluate the results.

Doing a search I learned that Apple limits file sizes on shared downloads. Sharing full resolution photos - Apple Community. So long term, I need to find another sharing solution for my son.
Two simple solutions that I do not believe limit the file sizes or compress the images of the original file are Dropbox and Flickr. For casual use, both should be fairly easy to use.

--Ken
 
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