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CC App LRc on Windows on ARM

SunnyUK

New Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2021
Messages
12
Location
York, England
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
Lightroom Version Number
13
Operating System
  1. Windows 11
  2. Other (please note in thread)
I'm currently using Lightroom mobile on an iPad and Lightroom Classic on my desktop. I'm not really happy with the iPad. For that reason, I am tempted to put in a pre-order for the newly announced MS Surface Pro 11.

I've never known anything about Windows-on-ARM, but googling over the last couple of days have educated to me to now understand that LRc does not run natively on an ARM processor. However, I was somewhat reassured by this (paid for by Microsoft) analysis of the performance of the new Surface 11, including a page about Lightroom Classic: https://signal65.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/NewSurfaceLaptop2024_Signal65LabInsights.pdf

But continued googling makes me scratch my head. I came across an article yesterday that suggested LRc can simly not be installed on Windows-on-ARM. The more I google and try to put the pieces together, the more in doubt I become. Part of the problem may be that some of the articles I am reading are old and contain outdated information. But it's really difficult (for me) to get it clear in my head.

Does anyone know categorically whether LRc can be installed and successfully run in emulation mode on Windows-on-ARM?
 
Someone asked us this earlier this week (Snapdragon). We suggested putting a Feature Request on the Adobe Community Forums. Currently, Windows on Intel is the only Windows version listed as supported by Adobe.
 
FWIW, ARM. Chipsets are Reduced Instruction Set Computers (RISC). The Apple Silicon (M Series) are based upon a 64 bit ARM technology. So it would seem that a LrC Silicon compile might be recompiled to run on a MS Surface Pro.
 
I'm currently using Lightroom mobile on an iPad and Lightroom Classic on my desktop.
The article you cite seems confused to me. Microsoft has been fooling around with ARM chips for years but the problem has always been that the most popular and capable Windows apps don't run on them, or run in crippled form.

To measure the performance of Lightroom Classic we used the PugetBench tool, and the results are impressive.

It is worth noting that the standard version of Adobe Lightroom (not the Classic version that many users still
use) does run natively on Windows on Arm.

And then it mentions by version number "Adobe Lightroom Classic 13.2" in its footnotes but not any version of Lightroom Desktop (aka what the article seems to call the "standard version of Adobe Lightroom").
 
FWIW, ARM. Chipsets are Reduced Instruction Set Computers (RISC). The Apple Silicon (M Series) are based upon a 64 bit ARM technology. So it would seem that a LrC Silicon compile might be recompiled to run on a MS Surface Pro.

From what I have been reading, Microsoft is working hard to provide a dynamic translator called “Prism” that would let non-native software run, although of course a recompiled version would always be better. In other words, from the Mac point of view, Microsoft Prism aims to do what the Rosetta 2 translator did for Apple Silicon Macs: Allow Intel-based apps to run on its ARM-based OS.
 
Microsoft is working hard to provide a dynamic translator called “Prism” that would let non-native software run
Microsoft has been trying to do this ever since they released their operating system called Windows RT back in 2011 and sold Windows machines powered by ARM chips to run it. Good luck to them!

Apple has done this successfully twice -- when they switched to Intel chips (Rosetta) and then when they switched to their own Apple Silicon chips (Rosetta 2). And now probably 99% of software running on Apple Macs runs natively on Apple Silicon.
 
Microsoft has been trying to do this ever since they released their operating system called Windows RT back in 2011 and sold Windows machines powered by ARM chips to run it. Good luck to them!

Yeah, that’s true. But this time they have to do it and get it right. The difference in the past was it was just Microsoft putting out an ARM PC, which had a mediocre processor and didn’t sell well…easy for users and developers to ignore. But this time (according to the Surface/Copilot launch events this week), just about every major PC OEM is announcing ARM-based “Copilot+” systems for Windows. It’s like the Apple Silicon launch…but by everybody else. That will greatly expand the scope of people who will buy an ARM PC for the efficiency and performance, and who will still have Intel apps that they will want to run while waiting for them to be ARM-optimized.
 
FWIW, ARM. Chipsets are Reduced Instruction Set Computers (RISC). The Apple Silicon (M Series) are based upon a 64 bit ARM technology. So it would seem that a LrC Silicon compile might be recompiled to run on a MS Surface Pro.
The operative word here is might.

@ConradChavez summed up the situation quite well. Instead of pre-ordering a new MS Surface system, wait until the major OEMs like Lenovo, HP, et all have announced product and then read some reviews fromt trusted sites. (e.g. NOT, NOT, NOT Amazon). The new Surface devices set a high bar, but if the other manufacturers can't cross over that bar, then they will decline significantly in the marketplace.

Longer term for Arm? Who knows how fast Adobe and other software vendors modify their product to run on Windows on ARM.

My next desktop build in ~ 2 years might be based on an Arm CPU (by AMD, of course).
 
Thank you very much for replies and thoughts.

@Paul McFarlane thank you, and I have now raised it on the Adobe community forum. Apologies for creating a new thread instead of finding the previous one - I did try, but my search skills are clearly not up to scratch :)

@clee01l I agree. It seems it might be possible. My understanding is that biggest obstacles with emulation is the software components (libraries etc) that are not under the software developer's control.

@karl.nyhus , yes, a bit clearer messaging from them wouldn't go amiss

@PhilBurton totally agree on the "wait for proper hands-on reviews" approach.

@johnrellis that is reassuring, and actually quite an interesting idea with two layers of emulation/abstraction. It stands to reason that if it can run in a Windows ARM VM then it also ought to be able to run on a physical machine. I will keep my fingers crossed, b
 
Also, Adobe already provides a Windows (ARM) version of Lightroom Desktop:

1716574204829.png

1716574222045.png


Lightroom Desktop is much newer with far less legacy bloatware in it, so it's presumably much easier to compile for ARM.
 
Good to know…. personally, I am happy to see computing architecture evolve… but it seems to me that advances in hardware performance is regularly balanced by increased bloat in application and system software.
 
One of the major concerns in this thread is about the Adobe commitment to ARM Windows. This week several news sources have reported that:

Adobe has pledged to finally bring its full suite of tools to Windows on Arm, ending its long-time scepticism…Adobe's adoption of Windows on Arm has been generally slow, but not exactly non-existent. A few of their apps are built natively for Arm, including Photoshop, but at today's big Microsoft AI and Surface event, Adobe pledged broader support…
…Announcing during the event, Adobe said that it's full range of apps is coming "soon" to Microsoft's new AI PC contingent, generally powered by the Snapdragon X Elite SoC…
…"Together with Adobe, we are thrilled to announce Adobe’s flagship apps are coming to Copilot+ PCs, including Photoshop, Lightroom and Express – available today," Microsoft said. "Illustrator, Premiere Pro and more are coming this summer. And we’re continuing to partner to optimize AI in these apps for the NPU.

– from Windows on Arm to get Adobe Premier Pro and more, after Adobe FINALLY pledges full support (Windows Central)

The “NPU” in the last quoted sentence is the “Neural Processing Unit” AI accelerator that’s required for PCs meeting Microsoft Copilot+ specs. It’s roughly comparable to the Apple Neural Engine component of Apple Silicon processors. As of this week Adobe enabled Apple Neural Engine support to further accelerate AI Denoise processing in Lightroom Classic for macOS. The NPU takes some of the burden of AI processing off the GPU and CPU, in the same way that we have seen the GPU take the burden of graphics processing off the CPU. So the NPU acceleration of AI that Adobe is now taking advantage of on Macs will eventually happen on NPU-equipped PCs too.
 
then it also ought to be able to run on a physical machine. I will keep my fingers crossed, b
Yes, but. In the crazy world of software "ought to" and "actually does" aren't necessarily the same. Assume but verify.
 
@johnrellis that is reassuring, and actually quite an interesting idea with two layers of emulation/abstraction. It stands to reason that if it can run in a Windows ARM VM then it also ought to be able to run on a physical machine. I will keep my fingers crossed, b
This has been done for quiet awhile. A software company I worked more made out MS/Intel based software available on Unix/Linux systems by using Windows library emulators on the Unix/Linux systems.

However, as noted in the article the OP posted

"Windows on Arm runs native Arm apps, as well as many unmodified x86 & x64 apps, but for the best performance and battery life, apps should be built to be Arm-native wherever possible."
 
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