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Lightroom changing resolution to 240dpi when sending to Photoshop?

lchh

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Dec 19, 2020
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Version 4.1, 20201120-1311-17d302b Build.
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  1. Windows 10
I firstly edit my photos in Lightroom, and then edit again in Photoshop. The photos are 300dpi in Lightroom, but when they arrive in Photoshop they have changed to 240dpi. This happens regardless of whether I crop a photo or not.

I cannot see any way to set this to stop this happening, but clearly I'm missing something? I presume it's a setting in Lightroom, but 'Preferences' now has hardly any settings to tweak. I am using the latest desktop Cloud version.

Help gratefully appreciated.
 
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That is indeed the default. As ppi is irrelevant, I wouldn’t bother. You can’t change it in Lightroom, but you obviously can in Photoshop.
 
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Agree- "irrelevant".
But if it worries you- how are the options set in your External Editing Preferences?
ScreenShot359.jpg

And there are Preferences in Photoshop's Camera Raw Options-
ScreenShot358.jpg
 

lchh

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Thanks both of you. I didn't realise that was the default.

It's a pain though, as I have to remember to check/change the dpi in Photoshop each time.
 
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Thanks both of you. I didn't realise that was the default.

It's a pain though, as I have to remember to check/change the dpi in Photoshop each time.
Like I said, it’s ppi not dpi. Images are made of pixels, not dots. Why do you think that 300 ppi is important enough to change it?
 

lchh

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Sorry, I meant PPI ! I like them to be 300 for printing purposes.
 
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the photos are 300dpi in Lightroom, but when they arrive in Photoshop they have changed to 240dpi.
An inch is a physical dimension. It is Only valid on a paper print. Pixels don't have inches because they are dimensionless until printed on paper or displayed on a fixed pitch computer screen. Photoshop offers a sizing option in ppi in anticipation of printing, In all other cases it is irrelevant. It is always irrelevant in Lightroom except in the Lightroom Classic Print module.
 
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Sorry, I meant PPI ! I like them to be 300 for printing purposes.
My advice would be not to bother. When you print an image, you will have the pixel dimensions of that image and the paper size you want to use. Based on those two things, the effective print resolution will be calculated regardless of what the ppi value of the file says. See below how Photoshop does this. The ppi value of the image is 300 ppi, but Photoshop chooses 355 ppi when I click 'Fit Media'. The printer driver will eventually resize to adjust for the printer hardware resolution. In other words: the ppi value doesn't matter, even for printing, because it normally gets overruled anyway.

1 2021-01-11 11-07-50.jpg
 
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