Lessons from the Field of scanning old film archives

OogieM

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#1
Just a quick note on a few things I've learned over the last few weeks scanning lots of old slides and negatives.

When sorting out various film rolls(my file naming scheme has a field for roll number) get as close as you can, then scan into a working folder using VueScan’s default numbering and renumber/rename into final folders out of the working scans folder.

Since some of the “roll numbers” were at best approximations, plan on redoing them as you see fit. If there are no written records of what is what then might as well make it easy on yourself and renumber as required.

When looking at deer/elk heads, you can often determine roll numbers by carefully looking at the antler structure. If the animal has a different antler point structure, it's probably a different year or at lest a different hunter. (Bonus, check the big game licensing in the satte in effect at the time to detemine whether any given hunter can harvest 1 or more of any particlar sex of animal. )

If a slide mount or negative mount has a number make every effort to find the related frames and KEEP THE SAME NUMBER.
 

PhilBurton

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#2
Just a quick note on a few things I've learned over the last few weeks scanning lots of old slides and negatives.

When sorting out various film rolls(my file naming scheme has a field for roll number) get as close as you can, then scan into a working folder using VueScan’s default numbering and renumber/rename into final folders out of the working scans folder.

Since some of the “roll numbers” were at best approximations, plan on redoing them as you see fit. If there are no written records of what is what then might as well make it easy on yourself and renumber as required.
Who or what created the roll numbers?

When looking at deer/elk heads, you can often determine roll numbers by carefully looking at the antler structure. If the animal has a different antler point structure, it's probably a different year or at lest a different hunter. (Bonus, check the big game licensing in the satte in effect at the time to detemine whether any given hunter can harvest 1 or more of any particlar sex of animal. )
Can't comment here. I photograph trains a lot.

If a slide mount or negative mount has a number make every effort to find the related frames and KEEP THE SAME NUMBER.
Sounds good. I would add that for slides processed by Kodak, also record those odd codes that indicate the month of processing and the processing lab.

Phil
 

OogieM

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Roll numbers came from handwritten notes from either my mother or my father, both of whom have been dead for over 20 years now. New ones I've created myself after careful verification sometimes by piecing the negative (which were all hand cut into frames) by lining up the cut edges like puzzle pieces.

Antlers grow very individually. I think my mother grouped all elk and deer hunting shots together. Until they were scanned and I could see the positive I'd have believed the deer were the same and the elk the same. Turns out only 1 elk so far but at least 3 different deer.

All slides and negatives were hand processed by my parents. I don't have any of theirs that were processed by Kodak in this batch. So no help there.

A few of the 2 1/4 x 2/ 1/4 positives are mounted in kodak slide mounts but were processed by a photo shop in Denver in the 60's. No numbers or identifying info on the mounts though.
 
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