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ISO Adaptive Presets in Lightroom Classic Best Practices

Joined
Mar 31, 2011
Messages
16
Location
Brevard, NC, western NC mountains, US
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Lightroom Version
Lightroom Classic version: 10.1.1 [ 202101041610-8c69aa4e ]
Operating System
  1. Windows 10
When creating ISO adaptive presets what are the best practices. Is it better to use two images - one at the low end of ISO and one at the high end? Or is it better to use more at different ISO values from high to low?

What type of image is the best candidate to be used to create an ISO adaptive preset? For instance I have a lot of images for a particular camera shot at ISO 3200. The noise reduction and sharpening values for these images may vary. How do I choose the one to use to create an ISO adaptive preset?

And last - am I just over-thinking this?

Alan
 
Joined
Sep 29, 2007
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Isle of Wight, UK
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Cloud Service
Yes, I think it's worth having some interim photos, but I don't go crazy as it does interpolate between ISO's. I think my micro four thirds preset has values for 100, 800, 3200 and I don't tend to shoot higher than that as it's a small sensor.

I'd simply pick a photo that is fairly average for the type of photography you do. If they're all similar types of photos, flip through and get a feel for what's middle of the line... setting defaults doesn't mean you're never going to tweak the settings, but it just gets you in the right ballpark.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2007
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London
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The trouble is, you set one up nicely and then forget about it.

I'm doing the same as Victoria for my Fujis except it's 100, 1000, 3200 and for my full frame Nikons with 100, 1600, 3200. I'd choose images with plenty of not-too-gloomy shadows as these are areas where noise would be particularly distracting.
 
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Yes, because noise in such areas is more likely to be be damaging, and one can more readily distinguish the effects of different slider values.
 
Joined
Mar 31, 2011
Messages
16
Location
Brevard, NC, western NC mountains, US
Lightroom Experience
Power User
I guess my thoughts were in the right neighborhood. Thanks for the guidance offered here. I really appreciate it.

As a side note - I follow each of you on your web sites and on Twitter and want to thank each of you for all of your contributions to the Lightroom community.

Alan
 
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