Is it possible to add a canvas to a jpeg without recompressing it?

SpaceMonkey

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I've got a whole bunch of web ready jpegs, and many of them I've lost the original full size images due to one loss of data I can't explain, don't know how it happened. Anyways, I'm building a new website and the gallery I'm using is really great and I've spent a lot of time as well as some money with a web designer making it work really well, except I've just found out it only accepts maximum widths to constrain the image from just expanding to fill the page. Apparently this is something that's difficult with this kind of image gallery as far as the coding goes.

It's ok for my square Hasselblad images. But I've also got some galleries of digital images with some verticals, and I don't have the orignal files of many of them. I size them so they are all 550px tall so the height isn't jumping all around. But verticals means the width changes, and this image gallery enlarges the vertical images to fill up to the set width, which makes them look terrible not to mention the jarring effect of enlarging and then going back.

So my question is whether there is a way to add a canvas to a jpeg to widen the verticals to the same width as the horizontals, without re-compressing them? I found a neat plugin for Lightroom that adds canvas to images in the export process, but it won't work if I select "orginal" in the file type. I've emailed them about possibly fixing this, but haven't heard back yet.

Is there a way? Below is an example vertical image with the canvas applied. This one was recompressed though by Lightroom.

If the only way is to recompress, is there a best way to do it in Lightroom? I have a nifty plugin called "Mogrify 2" that allows me to add a canvas in export. Should I cap the file size at a certain number, say 280 (550x333 or something vertical image) or should I set the jpeg quality at a certain number?


 
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No. Compression occurs WHEN the JPEG is saved. Opening a JPEG decompresses the compressed file exposing the lossy data. the next time is it saved, the lossy generation 1 compressed is further compressed with more data loss as generation 2. JPEG. You can save it in a non lossy format like TIFF, it will still retain the generation 1 data losses but no generation 2 data losses since generation two is not a lossy JPEG.

If you want to add canvas go back to the original file that was imported into Lightroom Classic and work with that file. If the file is showing as Missing in LrC, then we can help you attempt to recover it if possible.
 

SpaceMonkey

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I've got one gallery of portraits where something happened (I have no idea what) and many images were lost. It was before I got my %$#% together with LR and got organizized. So I can't go back to the originals with the verticals in this project.

I'm kind of a perfectionist and really don't want to compress twice.
 

SpaceMonkey

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It's for a gallery on my website so a tiff isn't possible. :(
 
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It's for a gallery on my website so a tiff isn't possible. :(
Are you sure? TIFF is a pretty standard format. What website software do you use? An 8 bit compressed TIFF would not be much larger than an 8 bit lossy JPEG
 

SpaceMonkey

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That's the problem isn't it? File size would be too big and load time wouldn't be practical for viewers. And I don't know if all browsers recognize tiff file format. Even if they do, the file size would be too large.

I use RapidWeaver website design software.
 
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That's the problem isn't it? File size would be too big and load time wouldn't be practical for viewers. And I don't know if all browsers recognize tiff file format. Even if they do, the file size would be too large.

I use RapidWeaver website design software.
An 8 bit compressed TIFF is small compared to a 16 bit Uncompressed TIFF. Since the initial JPEG is only 8 bit. Saving to a 16bit TIFF does not buy you any thing. Compressing TIFFs use a lossless compression algorithms. The resulting file is not much different from a JPEG of the same dimensions,

Browser display a variety of image file formats. JPEGs GIFs, PNGs, SVG and TIFFs being the most common.

I have D/L'd a trial of RapidWeaver to see what image formats are supported.
 
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I have D/L'd a trial of RapidWeaver to see what image formats are supported.
. it sees my TIFFs just fine. I hav en't figures out how to add any image JPEG or other to a Project Photo page yet But I am certain that if Added a TIFF file will show up on the website.
 

SpaceMonkey

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It depends on my image gallery as well but I will look into it thank you. If I can keep them under 200kb I’ll be happy. That’s assuming also that tiffs are recognized by all browsers and operating systems. I’ll check with the website builder who’s helping me out he’s very knowledgeable about such things.
Thank you!

if anyone has a magical workaround please do post.
 
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