I can color match my own monitors, but do I have any control over how others view my photos?

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The answer to my question, in the headline, is probably an obvious "No."
But having just spent hours getting my MacBook Pro and external 27-inch monitor to look pretty much the same, it's frustrating that I could turn over my photos to someone viewing them on a screen where the color is way off and the resolution is poor.
How do you handle that, so the quality of your hard work isn't lost on someone with a poor monitor?
Can you output your photos in a way that compensates for various problems, so the viewing experience is more acceptable?
Thanks for your help!
 
Can you output your photos in a way that compensates for various problems, so the viewing experience is more acceptable?
An interesting concept however:
  • Not all utilities used to simply display JPG files will properly respect the colour space of your export.
  • If there is a proper rendering tool, there is no way to know a) The colour quality of the monitor b) If it is a quality monitor, that it is calibrated.
So the best way is to use the sRGB colour space on export rather one of the broader gamuts. This will cover browsers and proper photo display tools.

Someone else can correct me if I'm wrong, but one way I think to see what a photo would look in sRGB is to Soft Proof it to the sRGB profile.
 
You are correct in that your answer is "no". You have no control over what device a person uses to view your images, nor do you have any control over how it is calibrated. This is why, as Paul alluded to in his post above, that we rely on the "Lingua Franca" of the electronic photo world, sRGB. It is the most common color space used by devices. If you specifically knew your target audience used a device that could display a larger color space, like Adobe RGB or P3, then you could save your images in that color space, but you still do not know if their device is calibrated, or what brightness it is set to.

--Ken
 
This is the best you can do:
  • Profile your display, and if it also supports calibration, do that too. (Those are two different things and most displays can only be profiled, but that’s often good enough.)
  • When exporting, make sure a color profile is embedded. Fortunately, Lightroom Classic and I think Lightroom both embed a profile on export, in fact there is no way not to. (Photoshop does let you save/export without a profile, but today that’s not a good idea.)
Once you do that, the image should appear more or less as intended on any other display that is reasonably profiled/calibrated, and if it’s viewed in a combination of app and OS that support color management.

Some people say this is a pointless exercise because many displays aren’t profiled properly. But you shouldn’t feel that hopeless…it’s not that bad.

If you edit on a profiled/calibrated display, although it might not appear as intended on displays that aren’t profiled/calibrated, at least you know it will appear consistent on displays that are. If you decided that there is no point in profiling/calibrating your own display, the problem is you would guarantee that there is no display that will show your images the way you saw them. So, profiling/calibrating is well worth doing. Because by doing so, your images have a chance to look their best on the displays of the people who might potentially be the most interested in your photography, because that audience is more likely to profile/calibrate their displays.

The historical perspective is very important too. People have been talking about this since the beginning of digital photography, when it really was random whether a common display was any good. And a lot of people still talk like displays are totally unreliable. But I disagree. In the last 10 years, the quality of common displays has improved immensely and is now much more consistent. If you visit websites such as Rtings and DisplayMate, you’ll see that the color accuracy of today’s affordable PC and phone/tablet displays is often highly rated even before profiling/calibrating. Apple XDR displays, which are now on every iPhone and most iPads as well as pro Macs, are tightly calibrated at the factory. Today, the problem of consumer displays being far out of spec is not nearly as much of a problem as it used to be in the 1990s or 2000s.

The main variables that are left today are things that are always going to be out of your control, like the brightness level at which people set their screens, and whether ambient light auto correction is on. But those aren’t worth worrying about. And realistically, that unreliability was somewhat true for print as well; You can make a print under your carefully controlled lighting conditions, then you hand it to someone who hangs it under different light (sunlight, dim living room, LED, office/kitchen fluorescent…) and the print colors look different. So even with print, there is only so much control you have over the presentation.

And don’t feel like you’re alone in this. Even before digital photography, every pro video editor already had to think about this issue because everybody’s TV is slightly different, and again, in the past the inconsistencies were worse. The TV/home video industry does the same thing: Make corrections on a calibrated reference display so that there are known conditions where the image appears as intended. And then just let it go.
 
I’ve read this a few times now. I have a question. What do you mean by hand over? Is someone going to continue editing your files? In that case then usually some type of arrangements for consistency are made.

Sending files to family/friends or posting at websites, etc. We have no control. All we can do is calibrate our gear and hope others viewing are calibrated as well. That includes screen brightness. If someone decides to keep their screen darker they won’t see all the effort we put in to maintain shadow details.

As stated just export as a JPEG and hope for the best.
 
…Sending files to family/friends or posting at websites, etc. We have no control. All we can do is calibrate our gear and hope others viewing are calibrated as well. That includes screen brightness. If someone decides to keep their screen darker they won’t see all the effort we put in to maintain shadow details. …
I someone viewing my photos doesn’t calibrate their display, I have no expectation that they will see the quality of the image that I have produced. At that point it is not my problem, it is theirs.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
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