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how to see preserved filenames after exporting to Windows

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cw1

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Joined
Jan 1, 2020
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6
Lightroom Version Number
Lightroom Classic v 10.2
Operating System
  1. Windows 10
After exporting to jpg, how can a user see the preserved filename in Windows?
If I open the exported file in Bridge the preserved filename is there, so I’m assuming it’s bound to the file.
 
I'd be surprised if you could see the preserved filename except in specialist apps like Bridge or other photo tools.
 
I don't see XMP -PreservedFileName exposed anywhere in Windowe; either in Explorer as a selectable field or in Properties. Mind you, Windows may haved changed the name. At the same time, a quick Google did not reveal any support so I suspect it is as John said; use a 3rd party product.
 
I was hoping that the preserved filename would be a unique identifier between me and clients, but I found that clients will strip the metadata and rename the jpg files. I found this utility which obviates the identifying images issue 6-12 months after they were created: pictureecho.com
 
I import my files with a custom filename.... the last 2 segments before the file extension are sssss_cccc. sssss is a unique number, incremented by 1 for every image imported to my catalog and ccccc is the sequence number as created by the camera.

I have comfort in having every image in my catalog with a unique sequence number, as this avoids duplicate file names. Also, when people refer to a filename I can immediately find the image and project it belongs to, using standard Lr search tools. But, regularly, having the camera sequence number has saved me hours and hours of frustration. It is useful in a variety of situations.... especially when cards get mixed up (happens when more than one person involved in a project). Today, in a remote location I allowed another photographer use my card (should never happen, but it did), which ended up with my images and another photographers images on a single card. I was able to use my normal workflow to import the images, then recognise the images (in Lr) which were not mine. I was then able to copy the other photographers images from the card (before I formatted it) and send via We Transfer.

I spent a long time trying to make sure the original filename stayed inside the metadata, but having my unique sequence number and the camera seq number as part of the filename has proved the most useful strategy for me.
 
I import my files with a custom filename.... the last 2 segments before the file extension are sssss_cccc. sssss is a unique number, incremented by 1 for every image imported to my catalog and ccccc is the sequence number as created by the camera.

I have comfort in having every image in my catalog with a unique sequence number, as this avoids duplicate file names. Also, when people refer to a filename I can immediately find the image and project it belongs to, using standard Lr search tools. But, regularly, having the camera sequence number has saved me hours and hours of frustration. It is useful in a variety of situations.... especially when cards get mixed up (happens when more than one person involved in a project). Today, in a remote location I allowed another photographer use my card (should never happen, but it did), which ended up with my images and another photographers images on a single card. I was able to use my normal workflow to import the images, then recognise the images (in Lr) which were not mine. I was then able to copy the other photographers images from the card (before I formatted it) and send via We Transfer.

I spent a long time trying to make sure the original filename stayed inside the metadata, but having my unique sequence number and the camera seq number as part of the filename has proved the most useful strategy for me.
I've gone back and forth on this question. I used to rename on import with a custom filename based on date/time + SEQN. Then I discovered that with multiple cameras (my Nikon DSLR + my phone camera + my wife's phone camera), applying the rename such that all photos were in their proper date/time sequence was a pain.

Now I have discovered that occasionally when I look for an unrenamed RAW file, I find duplicates. However, those duplicates are general years apart, and so for me, that issue is more easily managed.
 
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