• Welcome to the Lightroom Queen Forums! We're a friendly bunch, so please feel free to register and join in the conversation. If you're not familiar with forums, you'll find step by step instructions on how to post your first thread under Help at the bottom of the page. You're also welcome to download our free Lightroom Quick Start eBooks and explore our other FAQ resources.
  • Stop struggling with Lightroom! There's no need to spend hours hunting for the answers to your Lightroom 6 questions. All the information you need is in Adobe Lightroom 6 - The Missing FAQ!

    To help you get started, there's a series of easy tutorials to guide you through a simple workflow. As you grow in confidence, the book switches to a conversational FAQ format, so you can quickly find answers to advanced questions. When you upgrade to subscription, there's also a Lightroom Classic version available.
  • It's Lightroom update time again! No new features in the mid-April release, but new cameras, lens profiles and bug fixes. Here's the usual list

how to revert back to previous edit?

johnj2803

New Member
Joined
Jul 16, 2009
Messages
22
Location
Miami
lets say, i edited a picture. then after a few hours or days i edited it again but i want to compare it with the previous edit.

how can i do that?

OR

if ever i didn't want what i did in my new-er edit and want to revert back to the previous edit.

hows that?

thanks
 

Brad Snyder

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2007
Messages
6,293
Location
Port Deposit, Maryland USA
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Play with the history panel in Develop Module. Have a look at the snapshot function. Also try the Before/After compare view, the Y|Y icon, on the Develop tool bar. Any history state can be set as the before view. If you need details, just ask.
 
Joined
Jun 20, 2009
Messages
15,871
Location
Houston, TX USA
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Lightroom Version
Classic
In addition to what Brad has suggested, if you are planning any irrevokable forks in your edit stream, you should be gin with a virtual copy and make the change to the VC otherwise if you (for example) have a B&W and back up in history to before the B&W step and make a new edit step, you will lose the old fork.
 

hassiman

Active Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2009
Messages
303
Location
Kalifornia
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
As LR is non-destructive what would constitute an irrevokable fork in a LR edit stream? :eek:
 

dj_paige

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
1,293
Location
Rochester, NY
[quote author=hassiman link=topic=7293.msg49673#msg49673 date=1248199359]
As LR is non-destructive what would constitute an irrevokable fork in a LR edit stream? :eek:
[/quote]

Converting to B&W is an example. If you wanted a B&W and Color edit of the same image, virtual copies are the way to go. You wouldn't make the same sequence of edits to both ... so having one edit sequence with both B&W and Color doesn't make sense.

Of course, you can always go back to the original image and wipe out all of your changes.
 
Joined
Jun 20, 2009
Messages
15,871
Location
Houston, TX USA
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Lightroom Version
Classic
[quote author=hassiman link=topic=7293.msg49673#msg49673 date=1248199359]
As LR is non-destructive what would constitute an irrevokable fork in a LR edit stream? :eek:
[/quote]Non destructive in that it does not alter the original. Image applications that do not meet this non-destructive requirement have a 'Save' function. In LR, there is no Save, only Export. History steps don't really constitute a sequence. Just a set of adjustment states that represent the sliders on the right panel as well as other adjustments like crop, brush spot removal etc. at a point in development. History just 'remembers' the state of the adjustments at those named events. Going back to a prior step and adding a new adjustment essentially instructs LR to forget all states that followed the step where you forked. The old fork disappears unless you have made a snapshot. or a VC. The snapshot does not retain history, just the state at the snapshot. VC retains its history like the master.
 
Top