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Library module Help me think through this keywording issue

PhilBurton

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Back story: At one time I had high hopes for custom XMP metadata fields, because Adobe described such fields in their original documents about XMP. But they failed to follow through, and even today Lightroom doesn't natively support custom metadata fields. And even if Lightroom did, no other consumer desktop applications provide such support, to the best of my knowledge. So I have "embraced the inevitable" and I'm trying to use keywords as a substitute. End of back story.

Here is one example of where I need to use keywords as a substitute for custom XMP metadata fields.. As a way of managing my collections, I have defined top-level subject areas based on my photo interests. My goal is that a single image may fall into more than one such subject area, but I want every image to have at least one top-level subject entry AND I want to make sure that I don't confuse things by mis-spellings. In library science, I think the term is "controlled vocabulary." So I've created this keyword structure. (When I did my cut-and-paste, the indents got lost. In my source TXT file, all the specific keywords are indented.)

[@1 LIBRARY-Genres]
[Business]
[Family]
[Friends]
[Domestic/Functional]
[Events]
[Historical Record]
[Historically Significant Events]
[Other Interests]
[Objects]
[Photo Tests]
[Places]
[Rail]
[subject area process check]

Is my approach the best way to ensure that i have at least one top-level subject with the proper spelling?
  1. On Import, assign the entire [@1 LIBRARY-Genres] keywords to all photos.
  2. Just after Import, after culling, etc., I then delete the [@1 LIBRARY-Genres] keywords that do not apply. Also delete the keyword "subject area process check."
  3. I have smart collections set up (thank you John Beardsworth!) based on all photos that contain these various keywords.
If there is a better/easier way to accomplish my goals here, please tell me.

Phil Burton
 
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I'm new to this forum and don't see your attached txt file. but, I think I can deduce what your structure looks like.

Yes, you are on the right track. However, i don't see the need to attach ALL the KW's to each image upon import. Instead attach none. Then have a smart collection called "No Library Genres KW's" where the rule is that the image does not contain keyword @1 LIBRARY-GENRES. Then open that collection to see the images you haven't gotten to. Add some or all of those images to the quick collection (click letter B on keyboard). Open quick collection and aqpply desired keywords you want on each image.

The reason I suggest doing this in the quick collection is that as soon as you apply the first KW, the image is no longer in the smart collection and you may want more than one of these KW's on an image.
 

PhilBurton

Lightroom enthusiast (but still learning)
Premium Classic Member
Joined
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I'm new to this forum and don't see your attached txt file. but, I think I can deduce what your structure looks like.

Yes, you are on the right track. However, i don't see the need to attach ALL the KW's to each image upon import. Instead attach none. Then have a smart collection called "No Library Genres KW's" where the rule is that the image does not contain keyword @1 LIBRARY-GENRES. Then open that collection to see the images you haven't gotten to. Add some or all of those images to the quick collection (click letter B on keyboard). Open quick collection and aqpply desired keywords you want on each image.

The reason I suggest doing this in the quick collection is that as soon as you apply the first KW, the image is no longer in the smart collection and you may want more than one of these KW's on an image.
OK. That works.

Also I have to admit that I should NOT do new posts late at night. :speechless: I was confusing the overall keyword list with the keywords that I would apply as part of the import process.

Phil Burton
 
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I went a slightly different path.
Add a smart collection which looks for any image in current without @GenresDone
I would also created a collection set which has a smart collection for each genres looking for any image in the current collection which does not have X.
When done with this step, apply the tag @GenresDone and have it move to the next step in the flow.
As long as @GenresDone is marked not for export it is just a database entry.
This prevents needing to manage regular collections in the middle of your flow.

I actually use this pattern a few times in my flow.

Sent from my SM-J737T using Tapatalk
 

PhilBurton

Lightroom enthusiast (but still learning)
Premium Classic Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
2,510
Location
California, USA
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
I went a slightly different path.
Add a smart collection which looks for any image in current without @GenresDone
I would also created a collection set which has a smart collection for each genres looking for any image in the current collection which does not have X.
When done with this step, apply the tag @GenresDone and have it move to the next step in the flow.
As long as @GenresDone is marked not for export it is just a database entry.
This prevents needing to manage regular collections in the middle of your flow.

I actually use this pattern a few times in my flow.

Sent from my SM-J737T using Tapatalk
Tim,

I like this approach the best. Now that i will be substituting keywores for custom XMP, I can apply this approach in several different situations.y

I should clarify by saying that I had wanted to use custom XMP fields for railroad subjects, where the standard caption or picture description aren't adequate for being able to search for a specific subject item. when I first read about custom XMP, it was early days for that development. That was a while ago. If it hasn't happened by now, it's just not going to happen. Especially since the XMP champion in Adobe has left the company.

Phil Burton
 
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