GPS Pin in wrong position

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Apr 3, 2019
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Lightroom Version
Classic 12.0.1 Desktop
Operating System
  1. Windows 11
When I drag any photo onto the Map module with my mouse and release it at the position I want, the yellow pin always appears incorrectly about 30 yards north west.
If I then select the pin and drag it back to the original position, it now appears correctly. Any suggestions as to what is wrong are welcome.
 
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I believe this is a known bug.
 
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Thanks John. I've reverted to using the font selection 'Auto' in Lightroom's preferences & Windows 11 scaling 100%.
The GPS pins now work again correctly with these settings. I am left wondering why Adobe techies are content to leave a known issue unsolved for so long. If they can't be bothered to fix it, why continue to leave in menu items that cause the problems? Most odd !
 
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I am left wondering why Adobe techies are content to leave a known issue unsolved for so long. If they can't be bothered to fix it, why continue to leave in menu items that cause the problems?
I have no inside information. My educated speculation as a former engineering and product manager and longtime plugin developer: Almost certainly the managers have concluded that the cost of fixing the bug is too high for them. Likely influencing factors: The bug only strikes in some circumstances; it has a straightforward workaround; they may not have the engineering skills in-house. I've long suspected the last factor is in play -- the Map module uses a Javascript library for displaying Google Maps, and the engineer who first implemented it years ago is likely long gone from the LR team. LR doesn't use Javascript otherwise, so to fix this could involve hiring an outside contractor. It might also involve significant modifications or rewrites to the Javascript library, given its age.

There are many such bugs in LR that have gone unfixed. Because there aren't any serious competitors to LR (a desktop digital asset manager with an integrated raw workflow), Adobe doesn't have to worry much about customer defection or blowback to its brand reputation. I think Adobe underestimates the long-term impact of such an approach on customer perception and its own engineering team -- top engineers don't stay around long in companies that don't take pride in their work.
 

PhilBurton

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I have no inside information. My educated speculation as a former engineering and product manager and longtime plugin developer: Almost certainly the managers have concluded that the cost of fixing the bug is too high for them. Likely influencing factors: The bug only strikes in some circumstances; it has a straightforward workaround; they may not have the engineering skills in-house. I've long suspected the last factor is in play -- the Map module uses a Javascript library for displaying Google Maps, and the engineer who first implemented it years ago is likely long gone from the LR team. LR doesn't use Javascript otherwise, so to fix this could involve hiring an outside contractor. It might also involve significant modifications or rewrites to the Javascript library, given its age.

There are many such bugs in LR that have gone unfixed. Because there aren't any serious competitors to LR (a desktop digital asset manager with an integrated raw workflow), Adobe doesn't have to worry much about customer defection or blowback to its brand reputation. I think Adobe underestimates the long-term impact of such an approach on customer perception and its own engineering team -- top engineers don't stay around long in companies that don't take pride in their work.
A very, very belated comment on John's excellent post.

By the time the company, Adobe in this case, realizes the long-term reputational damage, it may be too late to fix this issue. If issues like these fester long enough, a competitor has the opportunity to swoop in, hire some good Adobe engineers, and gain significant market share. Not a prediction, but something that should worry Adobe top management when they aren't focusing on quarterly earnings growth.
 
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