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General locations (New York, NY) to show on Maps module?

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RobOK

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LrC 13.0.1
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Hello,
I have not been geo-tagging (despite previous great tips here), but I have whole folders or collections which I know at a minimum the City and State if not more precise locations.

I edited the EXIF locations, for this example, to be New York, NY in City and State respectively. But they don't seem to show up on Maps. Does Maps require a GPS coordinate location? I would love to on a map be able to distinquish NY from DC from San Francisco, even if not down to the street and specific location. Is this possible to do via EXIF tags or any other way?

I feel like if I drag onto a map it will record a specific GPS location that is not correct.

Any thoughts and guidance on how to do, shall i say, "rough mapping" vs geotagging.

EDIT: I also found this thread talking about keywording, but not my specific question of getting general locations on Maps without overly specific dragging onto a map location.

Thanks!
Rob.
 
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The Maps module uses Latitude and Longitude locations. Usually this requires a device to locate based upon global positioning. Phones have this Global positioning built in. Dedicated GPS devices can build a track that can be matched up with the camera’s Capture Date/time and even Attachments for camera s that will even wrote the coordinates into the image file metadata.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
For perspective, I use this Solmeta device on my D3. https://solmeta.com/Product/show/id/2/ This device plugs into the Nikon 10-pin connector and draws its power from the camera body. After you switch off the camera, the Solmeta device periodically checks its location. With this device in use, I can get maybe, maybe 500 shots on one battery charge. Nikon specs their own battery for 4000 shots, but I assume that's under ideal conditions. Also I'm now using a Wasabi Power battery. That all said, the Solmeta power drain is so bad that that I remove the battery from the camera body when not in use.

However this device writes GPS data directly into the metadata for each shot. Very simple to use the MAPS module in LrC.
 
Hello,
I know at a minimum the City and State if not more precise locations.
My question is directed at everyone. Using the MAPS module, I find the sublocation information inconsistent and frustrating. For urban areas, where sublocation can be important, I would like to be able to get a street and building number, or else the name of the streets at an intersection. However, the MAPS module, when I last used it, did not provide this level of information.

Suggestions or comments?
 
No, they are normally created by reading and mapping the GPS coordinates. It doesn’t work in the opposite direction.
 
Correct. None of the 5 location fields will generate a map reference if entered in LrC. Only the GPS coordinates will do that.

A roundabout way of doing it if the images are synced to the cloud.....add the City and State to the image in the cloud which DOES generate an approximate map location, then you could click on the mini-map to open Google Maps, which will show the GPS coordinates of that approximate location, then copy and paste the GPS coordinates back into LrD. The GPS data will then sync back to LrC and will then generate the Map reference in the Map module. As I said, very roundabout.....probably quicker to manually place the images into an approximate location in LrC's map module.
 

Reverse geocoding (address lookup)is a service of Google. Adobe has influence of the answers from Google.​

@hanoman

Thanks for that reference. The Google instructions for getting a key were incredibly unclear and confusing when I looked at them several months ago. Have you managed to decipher them?

And, have you been able to actually use this API? How?
 
@hanoman

Thanks for that reference. The Google instructions for getting a key were incredibly unclear and confusing when I looked at them several months ago. Have you managed to decipher them?

And, have you been able to actually use this API? How?
You don’t need a key unless you are writing or using a plugin which calls location data from Google. So Adobe would have obtained a key so the Map module could display Google‘s maps and reverse geocode.
 
Thank you, so to restate that in unambiguous terms -- City and State entered by me will not show up on Maps module at all, correct?
I’ve experimented with GPS devices attached to my camera but have always preferred to drag and drop onto Lightroom’s map,

I‘ll zoom in when I want to apply GPS values to record images were taken in Central Park, for example, and zoom out when I want a vaguer location like NYC or the upper Hudson. Lightroom can record precise GPS, or with fewer decimals, so it’s reasonably obvious afterwards.

I also apply the IPTC fields manually, as the Google data isn’t the way I think of the locations. In my case Google would think most of my images are in the country United Kingdom, and England as the state, London as the city. It’s more useful to have England or Scotland as the country, London or Cumbria as the state, boroughs at the city level, and what humans call a location rather than its official administrative name. Those thought processes are probably less useful in a US context, but I found the levels awkward in areas like the SW where Google’s city might be a tiny place 50 miles away and it would be more useful to enter the National Park as the city and the landscape feature as the location.

The Library Filter makes it easy to check that all these fields have been entered, so I try to enter this data as I work through each new set of photos. it soon builds up into a useful resource, useful for instance when returning to a location or wanting to do a book or gallery of the best shots from a certain area.
 
Probably not quite what you want, but you might find the "Saved Locations" function in the Map module useful. For example, search for "New York City" (say), and the map will update to show the location that it thinks is NYC. Then, click the "+" sign in the "Saved Locations" box to create a new location preset, give it a name (eg "New York City") and a radius (15 miles, or whatever you find appropriate). Now, whenever you want to place an image in that general location, just tick the check box next to the location preset. All images placed in this way will get the same GPS coordinates (at the center of the circle you defined), which won't be strictly correct, but at least they will all be in the exact same spot.
 
I‘ll zoom in when I want to apply GPS values to record images were taken in Central Park, for example, and zoom out when I want a vaguer location like NYC or the upper Hudson. Lightroom can record precise GPS, or with fewer decimals, so it’s reasonably obvious afterwards.

Probably not quite what you want, but you might find the "Saved Locations" function in the Map module useful. For example, search for "New York City" (say), and the map will update to show the location that it thinks is NYC. Then, click the "+" sign in the "Saved Locations" box to create a new location preset, give it a name (eg "New York City") and a radius (15 miles, or whatever you find appropriate). Now, whenever you want to place an image in that general location, just tick the check box next to the location preset. All images placed in this way will get the same GPS coordinates (at the center of the circle you defined), which won't be strictly correct, but at least they will all be in the exact same spot.

These are both helpful tips for my goal of imprecise geo-locating, thank you!!
 
You don’t need a key unless you are writing or using a plugin which calls location data from Google. So Adobe would have obtained a key so the Map module could display Google‘s maps and reverse geocode.
John,

So if I'm not using a plug-in, how can I utilize Google's reverse geocode API without a key?

Do you have a Google key for this service? Did you somehow manage to decrypt their instructions?
 
John,

So if I'm not using a plug-in, how can I utilize Google's reverse geocode API without a key?

You can’t, Phil. The key is your licence to query the API in a plugin or app. It’s not meant for general use.

Do you have a Google key for this service? Did you somehow manage to decrypt their instructions?
A long while ago, yes, when I was writing a web gallery that displayed Google Streetview inside Lightroom.
 
Then, click the "+" sign in the "Saved Locations" box to create a new location preset, give it a name (eg "New York City") and a radius (15 miles, or whatever you find appropriate). Now, whenever you want to place an image in that general location, just tick the check box next to the location preset. All images placed in this way will get the same GPS coordinates (at the center of the circle you defined), which won't be strictly correct, but at least they will all be in the exact same spot.
Speaking as someone who was born and raised in NYC (Brooklyn and Queens). If you identify a photo taken somewhere in Manhattan, let's say Midtown or Central Park, and then define a circle big enough to include at least parts of Brooklyn, Queens, The Bronx, and Staten Island, you will also get lots of locations in New Jersey. (Or Joisey, as we used to say. :) )

Just saying.
 
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