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Focus point in LRCC ?

tspear

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@JohanElzenga

I have a Canon 6D, I know from experience (subjectively, never measured) that the center focus point is faster and more accurate compared to one of the outer points. So when doing a quick picture, I will use focus recompose when the subject is farther away, the DoF is deep enough to get an acceptable picture.
I read somewhere a loooong time ago, focus recompose is good for quick shots. However, if you have time you should always use a focus point as close to your subject as possible before recomposing. Never paid attention to why until now.

So last night I played around with my camera a little to see if I could determine a test which works better for my camera. Center focus recompose, or switch to outer focus point. I even tried to time it....
I could not find a "repeatable" test; or one that felt/looks valid.
Any suggestions?
 
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Many cameras have a faster and more accurate center point than the outer points. I don't have the Canon EOS-6D, but I do have the Canon EOS-1D X and I'm sure it's the same with that camera. I don't believe however that the difference in accuracy is so large that using an outer point would be worse than the back focussing mistake you will make if you use the center point and then recompose. I'm 100% sure it's the opposite, but I have never done any testing. If you want to test it, then what you need to use is a fast lens at full opening, and a subject distance that causes a shallow DOF to begin with (so fairly close).
 
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Even if theoretically correct, I tend to disagree with you Johan. One should test for realistic condition use. Of course it is a major problem in macro photography, and it could be in portraiture. But I believe it is negligible in landscaping where focusing distances are in the orders of meters and the aperture is around F/9 (just an example).

And even if so, I struggle to find iconic masterpieces where a non-sharp focus totally destroys a photo (does Capa ring a bell?). Message is in the emotion, not in the pixel.

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I'm going to stop replying, because this discussion is leading nowhere and would only be repeating myself. I have said several times that there are many circumstances where the effect still is real, but where you don't see it because of the DOF. And then somebody says "I don't agree with you, because you often don't see it because of the DOF"...
 
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