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Exclude objects from a preset?

Brewder

Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2016
Messages
38
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Lightroom Version
6.14
Operating System
Windows 10
Hello,

I have a landscape preset that I really like (LR 6.14). The problem is if people are in the landscape shot, it really screws with their skin tones. What's the best way to apply a preset and exclude an object like a person?

//Brew
 

mcasan

Active Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
538
Location
Atlanta
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
apply the preset. Then use the adjustment brush which will turn off. the adjustments....and paint on the adjustments where you want them....on everything but the people.
 
Joined
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apply the preset. Then use the adjustment brush which will turn off. the adjustments....and paint on the adjustments where you want them....on everything but the people.
I'm not sure I follow the logic here. A preset applies an adjustment to the entire image. Depending on the type of adjustment, you could create a local adjustment in the adjustment brush, to ‘undo’ that preset adjustment. But then you’d have to paint only the areas you don’t want adjusted, so the faces.
 

Brewder

Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2016
Messages
38
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
I'm not sure I follow the logic here. A preset applies an adjustment to the entire image. Depending on the type of adjustment, you could create a local adjustment in the adjustment brush, to ‘undo’ that preset adjustment. But then you’d have to paint only the areas you don’t want adjusted, so the faces.
Thanks, this is exactly what I did do... but something wasn't working. I'll have to try again.

Thanks!
 
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The problem is that a preset may apply something that an adjustment brush cannot 'undo', because it does not contain the same adjustment. HSL for example, or Split Toning, or a camera profile. So depending on what the preset does, this may simply not be possible.
 

Brewder

Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2016
Messages
38
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
The problem is that a preset may apply something that an adjustment brush cannot 'undo', because it does not contain the same adjustment. HSL for example, or Split Toning, or a camera profile. So depending on what the preset does, this may simply not be possible.
I suspect this is exactly my problem.... so what's a better approach?
 

Hoggy

Never take life, or anything in it, too seriously.
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
527
Location
Wisconsin
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Don't forget about the temp & tint sliders. You might be able to use the adjustment brush and paint on enough of a temp/tint change that it could possibly overcome HSL/split-tone changes - also try the 'color' as well. You can even right-click the adjustment pin, and select "Duplicate" if need be. You might at least get it to a point where it's not as bad.
Also, if you know which area a preset is screwing up the skin tone, reverse it.. Like if it's a radial or grad filter that's in the preset, go in and paint those areas out.

Otherwise just don't use the preset.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2015
Messages
10,243
Location
Netherlands
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Lightroom Version
Don't forget about the temp & tint sliders. You might be able to use the adjustment brush and paint on enough of a temp/tint change that it could possibly overcome HSL/split-tone changes - also try the 'color' as well. You can even right-click the adjustment pin, and select "Duplicate" if need be. You might at least get it to a point where it's not as bad.
Also, if you know which area a preset is screwing up the skin tone, reverse it.. Like if it's a radial or grad filter that's in the preset, go in and paint those areas out.

Otherwise just don't use the preset.
If the preset is a grad filter or a radial filter, then you can obviously simply brush out the offending areas. But if the preset contains hue and saturation adjustments in HSL, it may be next to impossible to create a local adjustment that can ‘undo’ this. In that case it may be a better idea to not use that preset, but try to mimic what it does in a local adjustment (within the same limitations that local adjustments have, of course), so you can brush out faces.
 
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