Does "Delete to Disk" leave photos in 'Trash'?

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Rob_Cullen

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I have CC2015.10 on a Dell XPS17 Windows-10 on C: (SSD), images on internal E: 750Gb spin drive.
Last night I cleaned up my catalog to remove many, many files (NEF, DNG,JPG) that were full copies of my Desktop photos. I used 'X' to reject, I used the Spray can to apply 'X' to reject, then {Ctrl+Backspace} to Delete from Disk. I must have Rejected ~1000 image files.
Later I went to empty the Recycle Bin and all that it contained was ~ 60 JPG files. None of the raws were in the Trash.
Should I see the deleted files in the Trash?
 
I think this is at least partly dependant on how Windows is set up and how much space is involved and available. Windows will not allow too much to enter the wastebasket; how much "too much" is I think is settable, and I think there are some other innate limits (not setable?) on how large a single file can be, though you shouldn't hit that.

I just tried on mine and raw and xmp went to recycle (also W10). I don't use short cuts ,but the menu option and button picks but I assume that's the same.
 
Windows only keeps the most recent files in trash. By deleting large quantities of files at one time, you may fill up the spaced reserved by the OS for Trash. Also if the Filesystem on the drive is exFAT/Fat32, it does not support the NTFS trash function
 
Thanks Linwood and Cletus,
I went on a search to the Recycle Bin properties, and surprise! The maximum file size to have in the Recycle Bin was set to 9Mb- how strange. Never remember setting that. It answers the question why only 'smaller' JPGs appeared in the Trash.
Delete  (1).jpg Delete  (2).jpg
 
The maximum file size to have in the Recycle Bin was set to 9Mb-

Actually, that 9 MB is the maximum size of the entire recycle bin, not the maximum file size that the bin will accept. Windows seems to default that number to about 5% ot the total drive space.
 
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