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Digital Pixel / Color Blending

Shadow

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Aug 19, 2016
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A few weeks /months ago I came across a post, in a forum somewhere related to photography, that explained in digital media when blending / merging two or more colors together, they inaccurately blend and create a third / weird color.

There's a technique or way to setup Adobe products (that was mentioned and I've since forgotten) so that when multiple colors merge together, they accurately represent what you would see with your eyes in real life.

I've been trying to find that forum post or something similar for a few days; my searching is failing so I've come here, hopefully someone knows what I'm talking about.
 
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Not so "weird" actually.
You have CC subscription, so assume you have Photoshop.
Here is a practical exercise to demonstrate colour mixing-

In Photoshop create three layers, fill each with pure colour- 255 Blue, 255 Green, 255 Red.
Then set the top two layers so the Blending Mode = Screen.
Now you can selectively turn off one layer (with the eyeball icon) and see visually the colour that the other two layers produce. All three layers=White.
Red+Green=Yellow. Red+Blue=Magenta, Blue+Green=Cyan.

Oh- and does anybody really know what we see with our eyes "in real life"? Everyone's perception of colour can be different. Do you see Red the same way I see Red? (Colour blindness is another problem.)
Now the story gets philosophical.:snaphappy:

ScreenShot150.jpg ScreenShot151.jpg
 
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I haven't read that article either, but I don't think this is what the OP is talking about. I think it may have been about the fact that working in a gamma corrected color space can lead to color shifts in certain situations. The solution would be to work in a linear color space. As Lightroom uses an internal color space that the user cannot change (it is linear anyway), I think this is not relevant to this forum however.
 

Cerianthus

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Or does he mean Adobe gamma ( a very basic calibration tool)


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