• Welcome to the Lightroom Queen Forums! We're a friendly bunch, so please feel free to register and join in the conversation. If you're not familiar with forums, you'll find step by step instructions on how to post your first thread under Help at the bottom of the page. You're also welcome to download our free Lightroom Quick Start eBooks and explore our other FAQ resources.
  • It's Lightroom update time again! As well as the usual new cameras, lens profiles and bug fixes, Lightroom Classic has a new local Hue tool, improved ISO-specific defaults, performance improvements and more. The Lightroom cloud ecosystem also gets local Hue, as well as Versions, Activity notifications, text watermarking and the ability to upload your own Discovery tutorials. Here are the full updates about Lightroom Classic and the Lightroom cloud ecosystem.

Customizing Lightroom through TranslatedStrings.txt

Mark Sirota

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2007
Messages
4,055
Location
Philadelphia, PA, USA
Lightroom Experience
Power User
One of the several ways Lightroom can be customized is by editing/creating a file called TranslatedStrings.txt.

What it is

Ordinarily, this file is used by Lightroom to generate text suitable for the chosen language. It's how Lightroom knows that "Library" is "Catálogo" in Spanish, "カタログ" in Japanese, etc.

If you look inside your Lightroom application, you can find these files. There's a folder for each language, and in each there's a file called TranslatedStrings.txt.

For Spanish, es.lproj/TranslatedStrings.txt contains the line
Code:
"$$$/AgLibrary/Menu/Panels/Library=&Catálogo"
For Japanese, ja.lproj/TranslatedStrings.txt contains the line
Code:
"$$$/AgLibrary/Menu/Panels/Library=カタログ(&T)"
Almost any text that you see in Lightroom is passed through this mechanism in order to be displayed in the correct language, so just about any text in Lightroom can be customized. There are several thousand customizable strings.

Examples of customization

For example, I use this mechanism to customize the way image dimensions and apertures are displayed anywhere in Lightroom, such as the Loupe overlay:
Screen shot 2011-04-29 at 3.27.49 PM.png
  • Rather than "ƒ / 2.8", I use "ƒ⁄2.8" -- I've eliminated the spaces and used the unicode division slash rather than a standard slash.
  • Rather than "4256 x 2832, I use 4256×2832 -- I've eliminated the spaces and used the unicode multiplication sign rather than a lower-case letter x.
The main value of these two changes is the elimination of the spaces to makes things fit better in the Metadata panel, but I also think it just looks better throughout the application.

How to do it

To make customizations like these, create or edit a file called TranslatedStrings.txt embedded in the Lightroom application (see below for locations by operating system). To make the changes above, it would include:
Code:
"$$$/AgLibrary/Exif/DimensionsTemplate=^1^U+00D7^2"
"$$$/AgLibrary/Exif/FStopTemplate=^U+0192^U+2044^0"
The defaults for those two are:
Code:
"$$$/AgLibrary/Exif/DimensionsTemplate=^1 x ^2"
"$$$/AgLibrary/Exif/FStopTemplate=^U+0192 / ^0"
The location of TranslatedStrings.txt varies by operating system:

  • Mac: /Applications/Adobe Lightroom 3.app/Contents/Resources
  • Windows: \Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 3\Resources\
Put your custom TranslatedStrings.txt in the folder containing the language-specific folders. This parent file will override the settings in the language-specific files. (There is some evidence that putting the file in the parent folder is sometimes ineffective. In that case, create an "en" folder under Resources and put the file in there.)

Note

This file will be overwritten with each new Lightroom upgrade. Keep a copy separately somewhere so that you can re-install it each time you upgrade Lightroom.

Disclaimer

The TranslatedStrings.txt mechanism is not fully supported by Adobe. They probably won't answer you if you ask them for help on it. This may not work in future versions of Lightroom. The file may be overwritten by updates, so save a copy elsewhere. Use of this trick may increase your risk of getting head lice or smelly feet.
 
Last edited:

Mark Sirota

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2007
Messages
4,055
Location
Philadelphia, PA, USA
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Changing the naming scheme for Virtual Copies

Suppose you want to change the default naming scheme for virtual copies from "Copy 1", "Copy 2", ... to "VC1", "VC2", etc. You'd add this line to TranslatedStrings.txt:
Code:
"$$$/AgLibraryImages/DefaultCopyName=VC^1"
 
Top