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Correct setting to export to JPEG without huge file size

Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
40
Location
nyc
#1
I export to JPEGs with 100% quality, 3500 pixel on the long side and 300 dpi, and I notice that file size range from 15-20mb each. I found that to be huge, considering my 22MP raw file is only 30mb, and 3500 pixel works out to be 15MP. I also don't see the same quality to match what I see inside lightroom, when zoom in 100%. I m curious if I m missing a setting somewhere? I am hoping to keep jpeg below 15mb each with the same quality seen inside lightroom.
 
Joined
Mar 24, 2018
Messages
63
Location
Napa, California
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Lightroom Version
Classic 7
#2
It depends on your intended use of the exported file, but the advice I've been given by people who beta and alpha test for Adobe is that for printing, there is no gain in quality at 100%, as you've seen, and that 80% is just fine - and will make a real difference in file-size. I've never had a client complain about the quality of my delivered files for printing. As for the web, 72ppi, sRGB, and 50% quality works fine with images at 2000 pixels on the long side, and I've gotten decent results at lower levels - it really depends on the final pixel dimensions, mostly.
 

Hal P Anderson

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#3

Ferguson

Linwood Ferguson
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#4
Of course, you can experiment as JF did in the above (quite excellent) review, just export the same photo repeatedly and the view at various sizes.

One thing to bear in mind is that JPG quality loss tends to accumulate as you edit, so try never to use JPG for images to be further edited, but somewhat less obvious is that if used on web sites and similar, those sites will almost always resize the image themselves, with some further loss (it is a sort of edit), so starting a bit better than you might be happy with will give a bit of headroom for photo display sites to mess up.

However, much as Barry mentioned, by and large most of us use a far higher quality setting than is really merited in most cases.
 

clee01l

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#5
there is no gain in quality at 100%, as you've seen, and that 80% i
The scale in LR compression is 1-100. It is not a percentage. Photoshop uses a scale 1-12. Lightroom and Photoshop use the same compression algorithm. So in reality, it does not matter whether you use 93 or 100 you still get minimum compression equal to a PS value of 12. A setting of 80 falls into the 3rd level of compression between 75 and 83.
 
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
40
Location
nyc
#6
When I reduce the size of the image from 3500 on the long size, to 32xx (all other settings the same), I found that the file size dropped significantly, from 15-20mb to 5-10mb. Also the image actually looks better when zoom in 100%. I tried this with a bunch of images, shot with a canon 5d3 at iso3200, indoor, with flash. I can't explain why but at least this is the workaround for now.
 
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