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Commercial Scanning of Negatives

Joined
Jul 6, 2019
Messages
2
Lightroom Version
LR Classic
Operating System
Windows 10
I have quite a few negatives which I am planning to send out. They will either be sent to me in JPG, or for a premium I can have it sent to me as a TIFF. I am aware of the problems with JPG, but I am unclear if TIFF would give me more flexibility to make adjustments in Lightroom. Is all of the information there like with RAW, or is it something different?
 

PhilBurton

Lightroom enthusiast (but still learning)
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Joined
Nov 16, 2015
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California, USA
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I have quite a few negatives which I am planning to send out. They will either be sent to me in JPG, or for a premium I can have it sent to me as a TIFF. I am aware of the problems with JPG, but I am unclear if TIFF would give me more flexibility to make adjustments in Lightroom. Is all of the information there like with RAW, or is it something different?
What about scanner resolution? Is there a difference in pixel counts between the JPG and TIFF scans. What size negatives?

Phil
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2019
Messages
2
They are 35 mm color negatives. The plan is that they will be printed out at some point in the future. Again depending upon cost, I can have them done at 2000, 3000 or 4000 dpi.
 

ChuckTin

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Jul 25, 2012
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26
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East Central Fl
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I would not get JPEGs. I'd spent the extra for Tiff's. Tiff's have lossless compression jpegs do not. Tiff's have been universal since scanning started. Jpegs are a child of the internet consortium from the 1970s. The jpeg standards were engineered for the 1400 baud modem era.
Even considering the improvements of the Jpeg standard since "go" the format still had drawbacks.
 

PhilBurton

Lightroom enthusiast (but still learning)
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I would not get JPEGs. I'd spent the extra for Tiff's. Tiff's have lossless compression jpegs do not. Tiff's have been universal since scanning started. Jpegs are a child of the internet consortium from the 1970s. The jpeg standards were engineered for the 1400 baud modem era.
Even considering the improvements of the Jpeg standard since "go" the format still had drawbacks.
Agree on the TIFF recommendation. Also, consider the rule of thumb, which is that you want 300 dpi for prints. So for a 4" x 6" print, you would need 1200 pixels, so for best quality, get scans at 2000 dpi. If you want 8" x 10" or A4 size prints, go for the 4000 dpi scans.

Early modems were 300, 1200, and 2400 baud. (Hayes, anyone?)

Phil
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2007
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London
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Depending on your needs, a 35mm film scanner might be a good alternative.
 

ChuckTin

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2012
Messages
26
Location
East Central Fl
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Funny I remember 1440 and 2880, & think I've still got a chassis in the back with a modem still installed (i.e. not so long ago)
 
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