• Welcome to the Lightroom Queen Forums! We're a friendly bunch, so please feel free to register and join in the conversation. If you're not familiar with forums, you'll find step by step instructions on how to post your first thread under Help at the bottom of the page. You're also welcome to download our free Lightroom Quick Start eBooks and explore our other FAQ resources.
  • Are you ever disappointed with your photos? Do you get frustrated when you’re editing because you’ve been told to move certain sliders, but never been told WHY? Do you wish you could transform your photos without having to spend hours in front of the computer? In my new book, Adobe Lightroom - Edit Like a Pro, you’ll learn:
    • how to to analyze a photo like a pro, saving you hours of frustration.
    • WHY you might want to move specific sliders, instead of just following recipes.
    • what the sliders are doing behind the scenes.
    • how to use sliders together, instead of in isolation, so you can get the optimal result
    The book is based on the cloud-native Lightroom desktop and mobile apps, but the principles also apply to Lightroom 6 and Lightroom Classic. The sliders are arranged into slightly different panels, but there's an included PDF that shows you where to find them in Lightroom Classic/6.
  • It's Lightroom update time again! As well as the usual new cameras, lens profiles and bug fixes, Lightroom Classic has a new local Hue tool, improved ISO-specific defaults, performance improvements and more. The Lightroom cloud ecosystem also gets local Hue, as well as Versions, Activity notifications, text watermarking and the ability to upload your own Discovery tutorials. Here are the full updates about Lightroom Classic and the Lightroom cloud ecosystem.

Commercial Scanning of Negatives

Joined
Jul 6, 2019
Messages
2
Lightroom Version
LR Classic
Operating System
Windows 10
I have quite a few negatives which I am planning to send out. They will either be sent to me in JPG, or for a premium I can have it sent to me as a TIFF. I am aware of the problems with JPG, but I am unclear if TIFF would give me more flexibility to make adjustments in Lightroom. Is all of the information there like with RAW, or is it something different?
 

PhilBurton

Lightroom enthusiast (but still learning)
Premium Classic Member
Premium Cloud Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
2,128
Location
California, USA
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
I have quite a few negatives which I am planning to send out. They will either be sent to me in JPG, or for a premium I can have it sent to me as a TIFF. I am aware of the problems with JPG, but I am unclear if TIFF would give me more flexibility to make adjustments in Lightroom. Is all of the information there like with RAW, or is it something different?
What about scanner resolution? Is there a difference in pixel counts between the JPG and TIFF scans. What size negatives?

Phil
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2019
Messages
2
They are 35 mm color negatives. The plan is that they will be printed out at some point in the future. Again depending upon cost, I can have them done at 2000, 3000 or 4000 dpi.
 

ChuckTin

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2012
Messages
32
Location
East Central Fl
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
I would not get JPEGs. I'd spent the extra for Tiff's. Tiff's have lossless compression jpegs do not. Tiff's have been universal since scanning started. Jpegs are a child of the internet consortium from the 1970s. The jpeg standards were engineered for the 1400 baud modem era.
Even considering the improvements of the Jpeg standard since "go" the format still had drawbacks.
 

PhilBurton

Lightroom enthusiast (but still learning)
Premium Classic Member
Premium Cloud Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
2,128
Location
California, USA
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
I would not get JPEGs. I'd spent the extra for Tiff's. Tiff's have lossless compression jpegs do not. Tiff's have been universal since scanning started. Jpegs are a child of the internet consortium from the 1970s. The jpeg standards were engineered for the 1400 baud modem era.
Even considering the improvements of the Jpeg standard since "go" the format still had drawbacks.
Agree on the TIFF recommendation. Also, consider the rule of thumb, which is that you want 300 dpi for prints. So for a 4" x 6" print, you would need 1200 pixels, so for best quality, get scans at 2000 dpi. If you want 8" x 10" or A4 size prints, go for the 4000 dpi scans.

Early modems were 300, 1200, and 2400 baud. (Hayes, anyone?)

Phil
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2007
Messages
5,429
Location
London
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Depending on your needs, a 35mm film scanner might be a good alternative.
 

ChuckTin

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2012
Messages
32
Location
East Central Fl
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Funny I remember 1440 and 2880, & think I've still got a chassis in the back with a modem still installed (i.e. not so long ago)
 

aces1200

New Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2019
Messages
7
Location
Delaware, US
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Classic
My opinion: if the photos are important or precious to you, get TIFF. They are large files but you don't lose any information that's in the original. Once you have them you can always export them as jpegs for sharing. (and yes, LR editing is better with TIFF). The only question is how much data storage can you handle.
 

ChuckTin

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2012
Messages
32
Location
East Central Fl
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
I did scanning in a pro lab. The best output is always RGB Tiff, uncompressed. As long as you can handle the size.
Even for B&W you'd want RGB scans. That gives you extra data in case somebody graffetti'd on a family album or the colors have faded ala Kodacolor.
Also ask about dust reduction. Better done during the original scan than hunt-&-peck in PS believe me, I've done my share
 

CloudedGenie7

Windows 10 | Lightroom Classic | Nikon D850, D800E
Premium Classic Member
Premium Cloud Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Messages
12
Location
South Australia
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
I had all my 35 mm negatives (and a heap of old slides and prints) professionally scanned two years ago. I opted for the TIFF files, and would do it again. I had them put the scanned photos on a USB hard drive and send it to me.

At the price, I could have paid for a good scanner, but the negatives would have been (unscanned) in the box next to the scanner...

I did buy the slide scanning gadget for the D850... I will still use it, one day :)

Christelle
 

RoyReed

Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2017
Messages
26
Location
London, UK
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
6.x
Ask if there's a difference in bit depth between the JPG and TIF options. If the TIFs are 16bit per channel (as opposed to 8bit) then that's the option to go for as you will have MUCH more colour information - and it might explain the price difference between TIF and JPG.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2015
Messages
9,990
Location
Netherlands
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Lightroom Version
I'm not up on all recent specs for Jpegs but I'm doubting they're 16 bit per channel.
Jpeg only supports 8 bits per color. I do not see anybody here saying anything different.
 

ChuckTin

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2012
Messages
32
Location
East Central Fl
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
RReed said to check. Perhaps he meant to see if scanning was done in 16 bit then down converted to 8 for Jpeg. But as jpegs are 8 bits (by the definition I learned) I don't see any advantage to asking the question.
If it's a budget constraint, and that a legitimate concern, then Tiff's on media are probably out. But 16 bit Tiffs, providing the OP can use them(!), will be the superior output. And regardless of the originals I'd get RGB Tiff's as there are some tricks that can be done in color mode that aren't available with grey scale.
 

Klaas

Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2016
Messages
29
Location
Germany
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
6.x
The last year I scanned a lot of slides and negatives of the 35mm size with my Nikon scanner, with 4000 dpi each. I started with JPEG, but then I changed to TIFF, since only with TIFF a colour depth of 16 bit is available. TIFF gives you far better colours, especially, when you have colours of the same kind but with changing brightness, like a blue sky. TIFF is space comsuming, yes, but hard disk space is nowadays not a real problem. I store my TIFFs uncompressed, so I get about 110 MByte per TIFF. But on my hard disk is still a lot of free space, even if I have about 20,000 TIFFs and additional 15,000 JPEGs. A high dpi TIFF is worth it's price, I think.

Klaas
 
Top