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Can the White Balance Selector correction be altered permently?

Joined
Jul 5, 2015
Messages
77
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Lightroom Version
12.0.1
Operating System
  1. Windows 10
I frequently use the White Balance Selector with something white in the images. Most of the time, the correction after clicking on the white area gives a bluish result that needs the Temperature to be increased.

Is there a way to adjust the White Balance Selector so that against white the correction is warmer? [My monitor is color corrected]

Thank you,

Todd
 
Joined
May 9, 2015
Messages
1,421
Location
Palo Alto, CA
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Lightroom Version
Classic
The white balance "eyedropper" tool corrects the entire imag by adjusting Temp and Tint in such a way that the selected pixel is color neutral. Color neutral is not necessarily white. It may be a shade of gray or even black as long as all 3 RGB values are the same. If the pixel selected is indeed pure white, then the RGB values would be 100, 100, 100. If the selected pixel were, say, light gray, the you might have values of 95, 95, 95. Etc. But all 3 numbers should be the same within a tenth or two.

So, the first question is this. After using the WB Eyedropper on a "white" pixel, what are the RGB valuse of that pixel? If they are all the same within a tenth or two, then the WB Eyedropper is working correctly and your impression that the result has a blue color cast is caused by something else. Here are some possibilities:

  1. Your monitor needs to be calibrated (you say it already is so this may not be the problem)
  2. You video driver may not be working correctly - assure you have the latest update of the dirver installed and that it is specfic to your video card (not a generic one)
  3. Ambient light in the room may be fooling your eye into seeing a blue color cast. Look again at night with all the lights out (totally dark room)
  4. Other colored things around your monitor may be changing your impression of the color (#3 should take care of that as well),
  5. The Lightroom Classic workspace may be influencing your impression of the color. press lower case "L" on the keyboard twice to make everything other than the image itself black on the screen and see if it still looks blue. (press "L" again to return to normal).
  6. You may be forming cateracts which is a film over the surface of your eye that is sometimes a bit blue. See an Opthamolagist
  7. You may have developed a physical problem with your vision. I don't know your age, but as you get older most people form cateracts which is a film over the surface of the eye that many times has a blue or green tint. Some symptoms are if you think that your cars headlights are not as bright as you remember or headlights of on comming cars have halo or star burst type streaks radiating out from the light source, or colors just seem a a bit off are all signs of cateracts. See a qualified Opthamolagist or Optomitrist to have this checked out if you get this far down the list.
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2015
Messages
12,569
Location
Netherlands
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Do not use the WB eyedropper on an (almost) white pixel, but on a pixel that should be (light) grey. The reason is that an (almost) white pixel may have one or more clipped channels, and as a result you may get the wrong white balance.
 
Joined
Jul 5, 2015
Messages
77
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Califdan -
Thank you for your detailed response. I went and checked areas where I used the White Balance Selector and they are exactly white (within a tenth) and look white on my monitor. I made an error in expecting the skin tones of people in the image where I use some known white to set the color balance to correspond my preferences - they are "cold". For some portraits where I used a gray card with controlled lighting, the skin tones were close to my preferences.

Thanks...

Todd
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2015
Messages
12,569
Location
Netherlands
Lightroom Experience
Power User
If you use a grey card during shooting, then you can do what you want. Instead of using an absolutely neutral grey card, use an ‘almost grey’ patch that is slightly blue. If you click on this patch with the WB eyedropper, then Lightroom will make this slightly blue patch neutral, meaning it will make the WB a little warmer than what it would normally be. This color chart includes some ‘slightly colored grey’ patches: https://calibrite.com/product/colorchecker-passport-photo-2/
 
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