• Welcome to the Lightroom Queen Forums! We're a friendly bunch, so please feel free to register and join in the conversation. If you're not familiar with forums, you'll find step by step instructions on how to post your first thread under Help at the bottom of the page. You're also welcome to download our free Lightroom Quick Start eBooks and explore our other FAQ resources.
  • Stop struggling with Lightroom! There's no need to spend hours hunting for the answers to your Lightroom 6 questions. All the information you need is in Adobe Lightroom 6 - The Missing FAQ!

    To help you get started, there's a series of easy tutorials to guide you through a simple workflow. As you grow in confidence, the book switches to a conversational FAQ format, so you can quickly find answers to advanced questions. When you upgrade to subscription, there's also a Lightroom Classic version available.

Best way to resolve highlight clipping

lbeck

Active Member
Joined
May 21, 2015
Messages
150
Location
Hillsborough, NC
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
6.x
Lightroom Version
6.14
Operating System
  1. Windows 10
I've used an inexpensive slide scanner to scan a number of 35mm slides and return JPGs. Most of the slides came out well but several have some serious highlight clipping. I've tried using conventional exposure/cloning/healing/adjustment brush with unacceptable results (the clipped images look better than the "repaired" ones). Is there a technique or trick that I can try? Or is there software that can use to mitigate the blown out parts of the images?
 

PhilBurton

Lightroom enthusiast (but still learning)
Premium Classic Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
2,585
Location
California, USA
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
What scan software do you use?
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
43
Location
Denmark
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Cloud Service
NEVER adjust in the scanner software. It is a separate (maybee poor ) post adjusting software which does nothing in the scanner itself.
Use “Auto“, in all scanners, even the most expensive, then you will allways have the best highlight and shadow detail for perfect adjustments in LIghtroom.
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
43
Location
Denmark
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Cloud Service
Optical resolution in Nikon Scanners are 2000 or 4000 Pixels

Hasselblad (Former Imacon) are 8000 Pixels.

Some scanner “rescan”, this just improves noise, not resolution.

In scanner settings ALLWAYS use optical resolution. (Often underlined).

Other resolution are resampled in a poorer algoritm than in Lightroom/Photoshop. So do the upscaling in LR/PS + Super resolution.

In all programs allways Crop before any adjustments.

Never think about Dpi/PPI, only quality that counts are true number of pixels on longest edge.
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2007
Messages
2,433
Location
Puget Sound
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
NEVER adjust in the scanner software. It is a separate (maybee poor ) post adjusting software which does nothing in the scanner itself.
Use “Auto“, in all scanners, even the most expensive, then you will allways have the best highlight and shadow detail for perfect adjustments in LIghtroom.
I do not disagree, but I was thinking that if the software was dedicated to the hardware, it might actually turn down the brightness of the bulb, not make a software adjustment. Without specifically knowing what the OP is using, it is hard to know.

--Ken
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
43
Location
Denmark
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Cloud Service
I do not disagree, but I was thinking that if the software was dedicated to the hardware, it might actually turn down the brightness of the bulb, not make a software adjustment. Without specifically knowing what the OP is using, it is hard to know.

--Ken
In fact ALL fimscanners in reality only scan in "Auto" internally without you knowing.
There is absolutely no light or bulb adjustment etc.
You can easily destroy your histogram, blow your highlights in the attached slow scanner adjustment program.
Just set as Auto scan in best optical res., Crop, Resize and adjust in Lightroom for best result. This is also fastest.
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2007
Messages
2,433
Location
Puget Sound
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
In fact ALL fimscanners in reality only scan in "Auto" internally without you knowing.
There is absolutely no light or bulb adjustment etc.
You can easily destroy your histogram, blow your highlights in the attached slow scanner adjustment program.
Just set as Auto scan in best optical res., Crop, Resize and adjust in Lightroom for best result. This is also fastest.
Interesting that it is a binary choice for the lighting. Since that is the case, I would concur with doing all exposure adjustments with a known software package like LR.

--Ken
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
43
Location
Denmark
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Cloud Service
Interesting that it is a binary choice for the lighting. Since that is the case, I would concur with doing all exposure adjustments with a known software package like LR.

--Ken
Tip! Best reduce/control of real film grain in scanned film is Nik Collection by dxo. As standalone or perfect plugin for Lightroom. (Classic).
If you want to keep the grain visible, never save as jpg. (Makes image compression blocks of 8x8 Pixels) but save and print from Tiff.
 
Joined
Jun 20, 2009
Messages
18,440
Location
Houston, TX USA
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Lightroom Version
Cloud Service
Interesting that it is a binary choice for the lighting. Since that is the case, I would concur with doing all exposure adjustments with a known software package like LR.

--Ken

It would seem the solution to controlling the light on the scanned subject would be to increase the spaces speed. A darker scan = faster scan rate A lighter scan =slower scan rate with the light hitting the area being scanned longer. This assumes the image is scanned in the negative.

This same principle is used with camera shutter speed.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
Joined
Jul 2, 2015
Messages
11,502
Location
Netherlands
Lightroom Experience
Power User
Lightroom Version
Silverfast claims to increase the dynamic range by using multiple scanning at different exposures. I don’t think that’s ‘exposure’ in software, so maybe that is indeed what they use.
 

PhilBurton

Lightroom enthusiast (but still learning)
Premium Classic Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
2,585
Location
California, USA
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
Silverfast claims to increase the dynamic range by using multiple scanning at different exposures. I don’t think that’s ‘exposure’ in software, so maybe that is indeed what they use.
I can confirm that Silverfast multi-exposure does increase dynamic range with increased shadow detail, at least with Kodachrome slides. The equivalent settings with Vuescan did not show any increase in shadow detail. My scanner is an old Nikon 5000 ED. I have not tested NikonScan.
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2007
Messages
2,433
Location
Puget Sound
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
It would seem the solution to controlling the light on the scanned subject would be to increase the spaces speed. A darker scan = faster scan rate A lighter scan =slower scan rate with the light hitting the area being scanned longer. This assumes the image is scanned in the negative.

This same principle is used with camera shutter speed.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Assuming the software/hardware combination can do this, then yes, this would be a good solution.

--Ken
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
43
Location
Denmark
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Cloud Service
I can confirm that Silverfast multi-exposure does increase dynamic range with increased shadow detail, at least with Kodachrome slides. The equivalent settings with Vuescan did not show any increase in shadow detail. My scanner is an old Nikon 5000 ED. I have not tested NikonScan.
The "Multi-exposure" in Silver Fastare the same as HDR. it scans -1, 0 and +1 and sample that file for better tonality and noise reduction.
But still scan in Auto, with no adjustment curves and sharpening. Do it in LR
 
Top