• Welcome to the Lightroom Queen Forums! We're a friendly bunch, so please feel free to register and join in the conversation. If you're not familiar with forums, you'll find step by step instructions on how to post your first thread under Help at the bottom of the page. You're also welcome to download our free Lightroom Quick Start eBooks and explore our other FAQ resources.
  • Stop struggling with Lightroom! There's no need to spend hours hunting for the answers to your Lightroom 6 questions. All the information you need is in Adobe Lightroom 6 - The Missing FAQ!

    To help you get started, there's a series of easy tutorials to guide you through a simple workflow. As you grow in confidence, the book switches to a conversational FAQ format, so you can quickly find answers to advanced questions. When you upgrade to subscription, there's also a Lightroom Classic version available.

BACK UP

Rwentzel

Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2015
Messages
97
Location
Mtunzini, Kwa Zulu Natal,, South Africa
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
Lightroom Version
6.14
Operating System
  1. Windows 10
I back up my LR 6 Catalog well as my original photos on my internal hard drive to an external hard drive once a week.
All my photos in my catalog are in various Collections.
When I back up are these collections also saved.?
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2010
Messages
13,139
Location
West Sussex, UK
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Collections are "virtual", and exist only in the catalog. So if you backup the catalog, you automatically backup the collections as well.
 
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
2,461
Location
Fort Myers, FL
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Classic
Be aware that if you are just making a copy of what's on your hard disk, you are not protecting yourself against corrupted files you do not immediately discover. E.g. you install a new LR and it trashes all files from 2015. You don't notice for 3 weeks, and in that time you sync'd to your other drive which then dutifully made a copy of the corrupt files.

If you think that unlikely substitute any sort of error, including user error, which goes undetected for a while.

Sync's are not backup, despite what sync software vendors tell you. It's not a real backup unless you can do point in time restores.
 

Rwentzel

Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2015
Messages
97
Location
Mtunzini, Kwa Zulu Natal,, South Africa
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
Thanks Jim, pleased that my Collections are also backed up.
Linwood, not sure what I can do to limit the dangers you refer to. When I do backups I use alternate external harddrives. Does this lessen the risk.
 
Joined
Jan 18, 2009
Messages
2,461
Location
Fort Myers, FL
Lightroom Experience
Advanced
Lightroom Version
Classic
Ideally you should use backup software that does "versioning" or "Point in time recovery" (two of the common terms used). If you are not using backup software, but just copying files, it becomes harder.

Here's the mental test to do: Assume you had an image and replaced it with garbage of the same name today, but did not notice for 6 months. Would your backups have a copy that was 6+ months old so you could recover it?

The problem for most photographers is that they have years worth of images they may either never look at again, or look at very rarely. If something happens -- whether by human error or software problems or hardware problems -- we might not find out quickly at all. There are a few things one can do to sound alarms more quickly:

- With regard to the lightroom catalog, running the optimize and check feature with some regularity gives you a heads up on it.

- If you are using DNG's, there is a "Validate DNG files" option you can use, which checks the integrity of the image data inside the DNG (but not the metadata unfortunately). (Unfortunately there is no built-in option for raw, jpg, tiff, etc.)

- Periodically run the Find MIssing Files in Lightroom, to make sure whole files have no disappeared.

- Many people find programs, commercial or open source, sometimes integrated with their backup programs, which will take checksums of all files, save them somewhere, then do the same again and again -- it gives you a head's up if a file has changed that you did not expect to change (e.g. raw). This is useful even beyond Lightroom, for any kind of files you expect to sit on disk and not change to sound an alarm if they do change.

The reality is that most of the time our hardware is good enough, and software reliable enough, that absent a total failure files do not get corrupted. But equally real is that once in a while it does, and being prepared is a good thing.
 

Rwentzel

Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2015
Messages
97
Location
Mtunzini, Kwa Zulu Natal,, South Africa
Lightroom Experience
Intermediate
Lightroom Version
Classic
Ideally you should use backup software that does "versioning" or "Point in time recovery" (two of the common terms used). If you are not using backup software, but just copying files, it becomes harder.

Here's the mental test to do: Assume you had an image and replaced it with garbage of the same name today, but did not notice for 6 months. Would your backups have a copy that was 6+ months old so you could recover it?

The problem for most photographers is that they have years worth of images they may either never look at again, or look at very rarely. If something happens -- whether by human error or software problems or hardware problems -- we might not find out quickly at all. There are a few things one can do to sound alarms more quickly:

- With regard to the lightroom catalog, running the optimize and check feature with some regularity gives you a heads up on it.

- If you are using DNG's, there is a "Validate DNG files" option you can use, which checks the integrity of the image data inside the DNG (but not the metadata unfortunately). (Unfortunately there is no built-in option for raw, jpg, tiff, etc.)

- Periodically run the Find MIssing Files in Lightroom, to make sure whole files have no disappeared.

- Many people find programs, commercial or open source, sometimes integrated with their backup programs, which will take checksums of all files, save them somewhere, then do the same again and again -- it gives you a head's up if a file has changed that you did not expect to change (e.g. raw). This is useful even beyond Lightroom, for any kind of files you expect to sit on disk and not change to sound an alarm if they do change.

The reality is that most of the time our hardware is good enough, and software reliable enough, that absent a total failure files do not get corrupted. But equally real is that once in a while it does, and being prepared is a good thing.
Ideally you should use backup software that does "versioning" or "Point in time recovery" (two of the common terms used). If you are not using backup software, but just copying files, it becomes harder.

Here's the mental test to do: Assume you had an image and replaced it with garbage of the same name today, but did not notice for 6 months. Would your backups have a copy that was 6+ months old so you could recover it?

The problem for most photographers is that they have years worth of images they may either never look at again, or look at very rarely. If something happens -- whether by human error or software problems or hardware problems -- we might not find out quickly at all. There are a few things one can do to sound alarms more quickly:

- With regard to the lightroom catalog, running the optimize and check feature with some regularity gives you a heads up on it.

- If you are using DNG's, there is a "Validate DNG files" option you can use, which checks the integrity of the image data inside the DNG (but not the metadata unfortunately). (Unfortunately there is no built-in option for raw, jpg, tiff, etc.)

- Periodically run the Find MIssing Files in Lightroom, to make sure whole files have no disappeared.

- Many people find programs, commercial or open source, sometimes integrated with their backup programs, which will take checksums of all files, save them somewhere, then do the same again and again -- it gives you a head's up if a file has changed that you did not expect to change (e.g. raw). This is useful even beyond Lightroom, for any kind of files you expect to sit on disk and not change to sound an alarm if they do change.

The reality is that most of the time our hardware is good enough, and software reliable enough, that absent a total failure files do not get corrupted. But equally real is that once in a while it does, and being prepared is a good thing.
 
Top